Articles on orthodontics

What Are Orthodontic Braces?

Dr. Rajat Setia, Dentist
Dental braces are devices used in orthodontics that align, straighten and help to position tooth and/or teeth with regard to patients bite, while also working to improve the dental health.Types of Braces:1. Metal / Traditional bracesThese are the metal brackets and wires and the first thing that comes to mind of a patient on hearing the word braces. These are the least expensive type of braces available and the coloured bands give kids a chance to express themselves through a variety of colours. The major disadvantage of them is that they are the most noticeable type of braces.2. Ceramic bracesCeramic braces are the same size and shape as metal braces, except that they have tooth-colored or clear brackets that blend into teeth. Some even use tooth-colored wires to be even less noticeable. They are more expensive than metal braces and the brackets can stain easily if patients don’t care for them well enough.3. Lingual bracesLingual braces are the same as traditional metal braces, except that the brackets and wires are placed on the inside of teeth. Their biggest advantage is that they are invisible from the outside due to their placement but they are very difficult to clean, more expensive than the regular orthodontic treatment. Also, its regular adjustments take longer time and are more difficult than with traditional braces.4. AlignersThese are orthodontic aligners which consist of a series of custom-made, mouth guard-like clear plastic aligners. The aligners are removable and are replaced every few weeks as per the requirement and treatment planned by the dentist. These aligners are almost invisible and the patients can eat and drink whatever they want, unlike the regular orthodontic treatment. The Major disadvantages of these aligners are that these will not work for serious dental problems and is a more expensive option than braces. Since they are mouth-guard like aligners can be easily lost.

What Is Orthodontics?

Dr Vimanyu Kataria, Dentist
Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry that corrects teeth and jaws that are positioned improperly. Crooked teeth and teeth that do not fit together correctly are harder to keep clean, are at risk of being lost early due to tooth decay and periodontal disease, and cause extra stress on the chewing muscles that can lead to headaches, TMJ syndrome and neck, shoulder and back pain. Teeth that are crooked or not in the right place can also detract from one's appearance.The benefits of orthodontic treatment include a healthier mouth, a more pleasing appearance, and teeth that are more likely to last a lifetime.A specialist in this field is called an orthodontist. Orthodontists receive two or more years of education beyond their four years in dental school in an ADA-approved orthodontic training program.How do I Know if I Need Orthodontics?Only your dentist or orthodontist can determine whether you can benefit from orthodontics. Based on diagnostic tools that include a full medical and dental health history, a clinical exam, plaster models of your teeth, and special X-rays and photographs, an orthodontist or dentist can decide whether orthodontics are recommended, and develop a treatment plan that's right for you.If you have any of the following, you may be a candidate for orthodontic treatment:Overbite, sometimes called "buck teeth" — where the upper front teeth lie too far forward (stick out) over the lower teethUnderbite — a "bulldog" appearance where the lower teeth are too far forward or the upper teeth too far backCrossbite — when the upper teeth do not come down slightly in front of the lower teeth when biting together normallyOpen bite — space between the biting surfaces of the front and/or side teeth when the back teeth bite togetherMisplaced midline— when the center of your upper front teeth does not line up with the center of your lower front teethSpacing — gaps, or spaces, between the teeth as a result of missing teeth or teeth that do not "fill up" the mouthCrowding — when there are too many teeth for the dental ridge to accommodateHow Does Orthodontic Treatment Work?Many different types of appliances, both fixed and removable, are used to help move teeth, retrain muscles and affect the growth of the jaws. These appliances work by placing gentle pressure on the teeth and jaws. The severity of your problem will determine which orthodontic approach is likely to be the most effective.Fixed appliances include:Braces — the most common fixed appliances, braces consist of bands, wires and/or brackets. Bands are fixed around the teeth or tooth and used as anchors for the appliance, while brackets are most often bonded to the front of the tooth. Arch wires are passed through the brackets and attached to the bands. Tightening the arch wire puts tension on the teeth, gradually moving them to their proper position. Braces are usually adjusted monthly to bring about the desired results, which may be achieved within a few months to a few years. Today's braces are smaller, lighter and show far less metal than in the past. They come in bright colors for kids as well as clear styles preferred by many adults.Special fixed appliances — used to control thumb sucking or tongue thrusting, these appliances are attached to the teeth by bands. Because they are very uncomfortable during meals, they should be used only as a last resort.Fixed space maintainers — if a baby tooth is lost prematurely, a space maintainer is used to keep the space open until the permanent tooth erupts. A band is attached to the tooth next to the empty space, and a wire is extended to the tooth on the other side of the space.Removable appliances include:Aligners — an alternative to traditional braces for adults, serial aligners are being used by an increasing number of orthodontists to move teeth in the same way that fixed appliances work, only without metal wires and brackets. Aligners are virtually invisible and are removed for eating, brushing and flossing.Removable space maintainers — these devices serve the same function as fixed space maintainers. They're made with an acrylic base that fits over the jaw, and have plastic or wire branches between specific teeth to keep the space between them open.Jaw repositioning appliances — also called splints, these devices are worn on either the top or lower jaw, and help train the jaw to close in a more favorable position. They may be used for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ).Lip and cheek bumpers — these are designed to keep the lips or cheeks away from the teeth. Lip and cheek muscles can exert pressure on the teeth, and these bumpers help relieve that pressure.Palatal expander — a device used to widen the arch of the upper jaw. It is a plastic plate that fits over the roof of the mouth. Outward pressure applied to the plate by screws force the joints in the bones of the palate to open lengthwise, widening the palatal area.Removable retainers — worn on the roof of the mouth, these devices prevent shifting of the teeth to their previous position. They can also be modified and used to prevent thumb sucking.Headgear — with this device, a strap is placed around the back of the head and attached to a metal wire in front, or face bow. Headgear slows the growth of the upper jaw, and holds the back teeth where they are while the front teeth are pulled back.

Facts About Orthodontics

Dr. Amit Gupta, Dentist
Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry that corrects teeth and jaws that are positioned improperly. Crooked teeth and teeth that do not fit together correctly are harder to keep clean, are at risk of being lost early due to tooth decay and periodontal disease, and cause extra stress on the chewing muscles that can lead to headaches, TMJ syndrome and neck, shoulder and back pain. Teeth that are crooked or not in the right place can also detract from one's appearance.The benefits of orthodontic treatment include a healthier mouth, a more pleasing appearance, and teeth that are more likely to last a lifetime.A specialist in this field is called an orthodontist. Orthodontists receive three years of specialist education beyond their five years graduation in dental college in a DCI-approved orthodontic training program.How do I Know if I Need Orthodontics?Only your dentist or orthodontist can determine whether you can benefit from orthodontics. Based on diagnostic tools that include a full medical and dental health history, a clinical exam, plaster models of your teeth, and special X-rays and photographs, an orthodontist or dentist can decide whether orthodontics are  recommended, and develop a treatment plan that's right for you.If you have any of the following, you may be a candidate for orthodontic treatment:Overbite, sometimes called "buck teeth" — where the upper front teeth lie too far forward (stickout) over the lower teeth.Underbite — a "bulldog" appearance where the lower teeth are too far forward orthe upper teeth too far backCrossbite — when the upper teeth do not come down slightly in front of the lower teeth when biting together normally Open bite — space between the biting surfaces of the front and/or side teeth when the back teeth bite togetherThumb sucking – Sucking the thumb (or fingers) can deform nearby teeth and supporting bone. Spacing — gaps, or spaces, between the teeth as a result of missing teeth or teeth that do not "fill up" the mouthCrowding — when there are too many teeth for the dental ridge to accommodate Deep bite -  The upper front teeth cover the lower teeth. A deep bite can cause excessive wear of the front teethand gum damage behind the upper front teethAT WHAT AGE ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT CAN BE STARTEDOrthodontic treatment can be started at any age. Many orthodontic problems are easier to correct if detected at an early age before jaw growth has slowed. Early treatment may mean that a patient can avoid surgery and more serious complications. The Indian Orthodontic society recommends that every child first visit an orthodontist byage seven or earlier if a problem is detected by parents, the family dentist or the child's physician.Braces for All AgesAdults: Orthodontic treatment can be successful at any age, and adults especially appreciate the benefits of a beautiful smile. One of every five patients in orthodontic treatment is over 21. Jaw surgery is more often required for adult orthodontic patients because their jaws are not growing. Adults also may have experienced some breakdown or loss of their teeth and bone that supports the teeth and may require periodontal treatment before, during and/or after orthodontic treatment. Bone loss can also limit the amount and direction of tooth movement that is advisable. Children: The Indian Orthodontic society recommends that every child first visit an orthodontist by the age of seven because your specialist can advise if orthodontic treatment is required and the best time for that patient to be treated. The first permanent molars and incisors have usually come in by that time and crossbites, crowding and other problems can be evaluated. When treatment is begun early, the orthodontist can guide the growth of the jaw and guide incoming permanent teeth. Early treatment can also regulate the width of the upper and lower dental arches, gain space for permanent teeth, avoid the need for permanent tooth extractions, reduce likelihood of impacted permanent teeth, correct thumb-sucking, and eliminate abnormal swallowing or speech problems. In other words, early treatment can simplify later treatment.WOULD AN ADULT PATIENT BENEFIT FROM ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT?Orthodontic treatment can be successful at any age. Everyone wants a beautiful and healthy smile. Twenty to twenty-five percent of orthodontic patients today are adults.HOW LONG DOES ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT TAKE?Treatment times vary on a case-by-case basis, but the average time is from one to three years for comprehensive treatment and can be as short as six months for short Phase procedures. Actual treatment time can be affected by growth and the severity of the problem. Patients grow at different rates and will respond variously to orthodontic treatment, so the time to case completion may differ from the original estimate. Treatment length is also dependent upon patient compliance.For example, the patient's diligent use of any prescribed rubber bands or headgear is an important factor in achieving the most efficient treatment. Maintaining good oral hygiene and keeping regular appointments are important in keeping treatment time on schedule.How Does Orthodontic Treatment Work?Many different types of appliances, both fixed and removable, are used to help move teeth, retrain muscles and affect the growth of the jaws. These appliances work by placing gentle pressure on the teeth and jaws. The severity of your problem will determine which orthodontic approach is likely to be the most effective.  Fixed appliances include: Braces — The most common fixed appliances, braces consist of bands, wires and/or brackets. Bands are fixed around the teeth or tooth and used as anchors for the appliance, while brackets are most often bonded to the front of the tooth. Arch wires are passed through the brackets and attached to the bands. Tightening the arch wire puts tension on the teeth,  gradually moving them to their proper position. Braces are usually adjusted monthly to bring about the desired results, which may be achieved within a few months to a few years. Today's braces are smaller, lighter and show far less metal than in the past. They come in bright colors for kids as well as clear styles preferred by many adults. You can choose the color of the ties that hold the wire in brackets. Wires are also less noticeable than they used to be and the latest materials move teeth faster with less discomfort to patients.Special fixed appliances — Used to control thumb sucking or tongue thrusting, these appliances are attached to the teeth by bands. Because they are very uncomfortable during meals, they should be used only as a last resort.Fixed space maintainers — If a baby tooth is lost prematurely, a space maintainer is used to keep the space open until the permanent tooth erupts. A band is attached to the tooth next to the empty space, and a wire is extended to the tooth on the other side of the space.  Removable appliances include: Removable space maintainers — These devices serve the same function as fixed space maintainers. They're made with an acrylic base that fits over the jaw, and have plastic or wire branches between specific teeth to keep the space between them open.Jaw repositioning appliances — Also called splints, these devices are worn on either the top or lower jaw, and help train the jaw to close in a more favorable position. They may be used for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ).Lip and cheek bumpers — These are designed to keep the lips or cheeks away from the teeth. Lip and cheek muscles can exert pressure on the teeth, and these bumpers help relieve that pressure.Palatal expander — A device used to widen the arch of the upper jaw. It is a plastic plate that fits over the roof of the mouth. Outward pressure applied to the plate by screws force the joints in the bones of the palate to open lengthwise, widening the palatal area.Removable retainers — Worn on the roof of the mouth, these devices prevent shifting of the teeth to their previous position after the fixed orthodontic treatment has been completed. They can also be modified and used to prevent thumb sucking.Headgear — With this device, a strap is placed around the back of the head and attached to a metal wire in front, or face bow. Headgear slows the growth of the upper jaw, and holds the back teeth where they are while the front teeth are pulled back. Why Straighten Teeth?Straight teeth help an individual to effectively bite, chew and speak. Straight teeth contribute to healthy teeth and gums. Properly aligned teeth and jaws may alleviate or prevent physical health problems. Teeth that work better also tend to look better. An attractive smile is a pleasant “side effect” of orthodontic treatment.An attractive smile is a wonderful asset. It contributes to self-esteem, self-confidence and self-image—important qualities at every age. A pleasing appearance is a vital component of self-confidence. A person's self-esteem often improves as orthodontic treatment brings teeth, lips and face into proportion. In this way, orthodontic treatment can benefit social and career success, as well as improve a person’s general attitude toward life.You may be surprised to learn that straight teeth are less prone to decay, gum disease and injury. Straight teeth collect less plaque, a colorless, sticky film composed of bacteria, food and saliva. Decay results when the bacteria in plaque feed on carbohydrates (sugar and starch) we eat or drink to produce acids that can cause cavities. Plaque also increases the risk for periodontal (gum) disease. When teeth are properly aligned, and less plaque collects, these risks decline. And when teeth are properly aligned it is easier to keep teeth clean. As for injuries to teeth, protruding upper teeth are more likely to be broken in an accident. When repositioned and aligned with other teeth, these teeth are most probably going to be at a decreased risk for fracture.Untreated orthodontic problems may become worse. They may lead to tooth decay, gum disease, destruction of the bone that holds teeth in place, and chewing and digestive difficulties. Orthodontic problems can cause abnormal wear of tooth surfaces, inefficient chewing function, excessive stress on gum tissue and the bone that supports the teeth, or  is alignment of the jaw joints (see photo above), sometimes leading to chronic headaches or pain in the face or neck. Treatment by an orthodontist to correct a problem early may be less costly than the restorative dental care required to treat more serious problems that can develop in later years.                                              

Invisible Orthodontics : Straighten Your Teeth Without Braces

Sukhmani Gill, Dentist
The first thing that somebody notices about you is your smile but not everyone is blessed with a perfect smile. Your smile can make a lasting impression about your personality. You may not be very comfortable taking to people or smiling because of your crooked smile, which leads to a very under confident personality.Choosing to straighten your teeth with braces/brackets is a big decision that affects not only your looks but changes your life style as well. It also  comes with several drawbacks like having recurrent mouth ulcers due to braces and wires, inability to  eat food properly , caries due to improper brushing and food accumulation and hypo calcified white spots to name a few. Many people suffer drastic  weight loss due to discomfort caused while eating food and eventually leads to loss of appetite.As an adult, you may be looking to improve your smile for business, social reasons or even for a special occasion like your wedding day. Or perhaps as a teenager too, if you are looking for advanced new technology which delivers cutting edge results. So in such cases  the solution to straight smile without use of train track braces is "INVISIBLE ORTHODONTICS."WHAT IS INVISIBLE ORTHODONTICS ?It is the way of straightening  your teeth with use of customized transparent / clear aligners.WHAT IS THE TREATMENT PROCESS?The first step is the consult with your doctor who examines your teeth properly, takes pictures from all required angles and makes a treatment plan for you. Choosing the right dentist is very crucial since not all dentists work with clear aligners, so it is very important to choose a dentist who has received a proper clear path training and can truly evaluate your needs.Based on the alignment of your teeth using 3-D technology, you are provided a set of clear aligners  created  specially for you. These are smooth , transparent and comfortable that don't irritate your cheeks and gums like what traditional braces do. And since they are transparent and fit your teeth perfectly, people won't even notice  that you are wearing them.Approximately every 2-3 weeks  you will be provided a new set of aligners  which you will wear for about 20 hours a day advancing you to the next stage closer to your final outcome. Your doctor monitors your progress by having occasional checks.WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES ?They are very comfortable , predictable as you can see the treatment results even before your treatment starts . These can be easily removed while eating , brushing and on special occasions if required thus making them extremely patient friendly.

Orthodontic Treatment

Dr. R. Rajkumar, Dentist
What is Orthodontics?Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry that corrects teeth and jaws that are positioned improperly. Crooked teeth and teeth that do not fit together correctly are harder to keep clean, are at risk of being lost early due to tooth decay and periodontal disease, and cause extra stress on the chewing muscles that can lead to headaches, TMJ syndrome and neck, shoulder and back pain. Teeth that are crooked or not in the right place can also detract from one's appearance.The benefits of orthodontic treatment include a healthier mouth, a more pleasing appearance, and teeth that are more likely to last a lifetime.A specialist in this field is called an orthodontist. Orthodontists receive two or more years of education beyond their four years in dental school in an ADA-approved orthodontic training program.How do I Know if I Need Orthodontics?Only your dentist or orthodontist can determine whether you can benefit from orthodontics. Based on diagnostic tools that include a full medical and dental health history, a clinical exam, plaster models of your teeth, and special X-rays and photographs, an orthodontist or dentist can decide whether orthodontics are recommended, and develop a treatment plan that's right for you.If you have any of the following, you may be a candidate for orthodontic treatment:Overbite, sometimes called "buck teeth" — where the upper front teeth lie too far forward (stick out) over the lower teethUnderbite — a "bulldog" appearance where the lower teeth are too far forward or the upper teeth too far backCrossbite — when the upper teeth do not come down slightly in front of the lower teeth when biting together normallyOpen bite — space between the biting surfaces of the front and/or side teeth when the back teeth bite togetherMisplaced midline— when the center of your upper front teeth does not line up with the center of your lower front teethSpacing — gaps, or spaces, between the teeth as a result of missing teeth or teeth that do not "fill up" the mouthCrowding — when there are too many teeth for the dental ridge to accommodateHow Does Orthodontic Treatment Work?Many different types of appliances, both fixed and removable, are used to help move teeth, retrain muscles and affect the growth of the jaws. These appliances work by placing gentle pressure on the teeth and jaws. The severity of your problem will determine which orthodontic approach is likely to be the most effective.Fixed appliances include:Braces — the most common fixed appliances, braces consist of bands, wires and/or brackets. Bands are fixed around the teeth or tooth and used as anchors for the appliance, while brackets are most often bonded to the front of the tooth. Arch wires are passed through the brackets and attached to the bands. Tightening the arch wire puts tension on the teeth, gradually moving them to their proper position. Braces are usually adjusted monthly to bring about the desired results, which may be achieved within a few months to a few years. Today's braces are smaller, lighter and show far less metal than in the past. They come in bright colors for kids as well as clear styles preferred by many adults.Special fixed appliances — used to control thumb sucking or tongue thrusting, these appliances are attached to the teeth by bands. Because they are very uncomfortable during meals, they should be used only as a last resort.Fixed space maintainers — if a baby tooth is lost prematurely, a space maintainer is used to keep the space open until the permanent tooth erupts. A band is attached to the tooth next to the empty space, and a wire is extended to the tooth on the other side of the space.Removable appliances include:Aligners — an alternative to traditional braces for adults, serial aligners are being used by an increasing number of orthodontists to move teeth in the same way that fixed appliances work, only without metal wires and brackets. Aligners are virtually invisible and are removed for eating, brushing and flossing.Removable space maintainers — these devices serve the same function as fixed space maintainers. They're made with an acrylic base that fits over the jaw, and have plastic or wire branches between specific teeth to keep the space between them open.Jaw repositioning appliances — also called splints, these devices are worn on either the top or lower jaw, and help train the jaw to close in a more favorable position. They may be used for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ).Lip and cheek bumpers — these are designed to keep the lips or cheeks away from the teeth. Lip and cheek muscles can exert pressure on the teeth, and these bumpers help relieve that pressure.Palatal expander — a device used to widen the arch of the upper jaw. It is a plastic plate that fits over the roof of the mouth. Outward pressure applied to the plate by screws force the joints in the bones of the palate to open lengthwise, widening the palatal area.Removable retainers — worn on the roof of the mouth, these devices prevent shifting of the teeth to their previous position. They can also be modified and used to prevent thumb sucking.Headgear — with this device, a strap is placed around the back of the head and attached to a metal wire in front, or face bow. Headgear slows the growth of the upper jaw, and holds the back teeth where they are while the front teeth are pulled back.

Is Orthodontics Right for Me?

Dr. N Srinivas, Dentist
ADULTS DO WEAR BRACES!!Braces aren't just for kids anymore.In fact,adults now comprise more than 20% of patients who seek the help of an orthodontist.In some cases,treatment consists of only removable appliances or retainers.In others,clear or tooth colored brackets,instead of traditional metal ones,can be used,or a patient may choose a system using clear matrices or lingual braces,which are mounted behind the teeth.Orthodontics is a long lasting ,conservative approach to close unsightly spaces between teeth.New techniques that are almost invisible have removed some of the stigma of having braces;however,orthodontics does take longer than most of the other options.Orthodontics may be best option if you:1.Want to use the most conservative method,in terms of cost and loss of tooth structure.2.Are willing to invest time in the procedure.3.Don't mind some compromise of esthetics during treatment.4.Will agree to wear your retainer at night indefinitely.5.Have otherwise healthy and attractive teeth.YOU DON'T HAVE TO WAIT!As a compromise,you may consider moving the teeth to a  more favorable position in just a  few months,then bonding or placing veneers on them in this improved position.The advantage to this is being able to give the teeth better proportions.ORTHODONTICS IS USUALLY BESTOrthodontics is the best solution for most people. Even if full crowns eventually will be needed,teeth should be aligned properly first.And although orthodontic treatment requires regular adjustments and the most time of the alternatives-usually taking 6 months to 2 years to complete-it has the advantage of leaving the natural teeth intact and being close to a permanent solution.Bonding, porcelain veneers,or crowns ,on the other hand, will usually require repair or periodic replacement.MAINTENANCE1.Brush and floss daily.2.Have a professional cleaning 3-4 times per year,atleast few nights per week.3.Wear retainers at night indefinitely.4.Use a water-powered device daily for thorough  cleaning.

5 Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth

Dr. Shefali Gupta, Dentist
Teeth play an important role to look attractive and  in overall nutrition and general health. Teeth allow you to follow a healthy diet and stay well nourished by preparing the food you eat for swallowing and digestion.However loss of teeth can have several hidden consequences-ON GENERAL HEALTH-The nutrition of elderly people is of growing interest to many health professionals.Missing teeth results in limited food choices.  Thus, nutritional changes begin to cause medical problems and affect your general well being.Even after the loss of one tooth, the jaw bone irreversibly changes. Without chewing pressure to stimulate the bone it begins to dissolve away immediately after extraction and continues forever unless any prosthesis is placed.FACIAL COSMETIC PROBLEMS-The deterioration of the jaw bones affects the appearance of how the face “drapes”over the bone. Facial sagging makes you look older, which is due to shrinkage in the upper and lower jaw bones further it may  cause profound emotional effects on individual.TOOTH DRIFTING AND DESTRUCTION OT THE REMAINING TEETH-When all the teeth are present they support each other much like the bricks in a roman archway.When some teeth are missing, the opposite teeth have no “counter acting force” and will erupt upward into the mouth. When no back teeth are touching the stress is now placed on the front teeth, this ‘overloads’ them and forces them to move forward and outward. When back molars are missing the damage is even more serious.The back chewing teeth begin to erupt down into the empty spaces where the lower molar teeth are missing. The chewing forces have shifted to the front teeth and due to overloaded stress the front teeth begin to flare and fan apart creating spaces.The fanning and spaces get worse over a period of time. This ‘’fanning out’’ and ‘’opening of the front spaces’’ eventually leads to looseness and gum disease and the loss of the front teeth.Even a single missing teeth can lead to drift (this is just like taking a brick out of an arch way and seeing the arch collapse). That one missing tooth can set you up for a “domino effect” of losing teeth for the rest of your life. Gum disease due to the movement and misalignment of the teeth can cause more tooth loss and decay.HEADACHE FROM MISSING TEETH-Without the support of back chewing teeth, as the teeth randomly drift, unusual dental bites develop that cause excessive stress and damage to the joints (TMJ) that connect the two jaw bones with pain and headaches being a common side effect.CHANGES IN SPEECH-Speech is a very sophisticated autonomous, and unconscious activity.They are intimately related as the mouth, lower jaw, lips,teeth and tongue are used for both activities. Any alteration of these structures will inevitably mediate a disturbance in the system.NEED TO REPLACE LOST TEETH-Earlier we see the various consequence due to loss of teeth, it affects the patients in many aspects. So it is necessary to have artificial replacements for the natural teeth becausethe body cannot function properly if some of the important organ involved in speech, swallowing and mastication are lost. Common approaches to replacing a lost tooth are the dental implants, fixed partial dentures, removable partial dentures. The most appropriate for you will depend on a variety of factors that you should discuss with your dentist.

5 Common Mistakes People Make While Brushing and How to Fix Them

Dr. Diksha Tahilramani Batra, Dentist
Dentistry is not expensive, neglect is! Brushing is an activity that has been embedded in our systems since time immemorial. It’s an exercise you start and end your day with, a routine that can sometimes pass by almost subconsciously, leading to bad habits and ultimately poor oral health and hygiene.Here are a few mistakes people commonly make when brushing their teeth.Not using the proper toothbrush The biggest myth of our time is to buy a medium or hard tooth brush to clean more effectively that’s what causes the maximum damage over the years by wearing off healthy natural teeth with overzealous care.Using an anti-sensitivity/whitening toothpaste permanentlyA common mistake is to use a medicated tooth paste meant to mask sensitivity over a prolonged period.Such a practice only masks the symptom does not treat the problem and also leaves you vulnerable to cavities, gum disease and bad breath since the predominant component in such a tooth paste is for treating sensitivity or lightening tooth color.The type of toothpaste that you use doesn’t matter very significantly as long as you use the right amount and twice a day.Sensitive toothpastes are meant to be used for a prescribed period of time and whitening toothpastes must be used under supervision to prevent any potential damage to your teeth.Toothpaste must protect your teeth and gums both so a combination of paste that contains fluoride that protects your teeth from decay -and the gel based part has the antibacterial properties to prevent gum disease and bad breath.Brushing too quickly or too many timesMost of us hate going to the dentist and find brushing an easier alternative but you cant exactly brush off old cavities just prevent new ones.See to it that you do not brush your teeth more than twice in a day. Excessive brushing can damage your gums and enamel. It will not take a lot of pressure to remove the plaque; hence most dental practitioners suggest brushing using a very balanced pressure.Studies show that brushing two times a day and about 2-3 minutes every time is perfect to maintain good oral hygiene. Most people make the mistake of falling short of this duration every time they brush. You can ideally divide the mouth in four sections and approximately spend around 30-40 seconds on each section.Incorrect brushing techniqueThe strokes while brushing your teeth must be vertical and not horizontal. Many people are habituated with performing long horizontal brushing strokes; this leads to irritation and damage.Learn the right techniqueHold your brush at an angle of 45 degrees to your gums and brush your gums and teeth with an up and down motion and short strokes. Don’t use side to side strokes. Also, start brushing on areas that you have been ignoring till now, reach the difficult to reach inner portion of your teeth. Implement it as a daily ritual and you will attain perfection in it.Wrestling or brushingHard brushing damages the gums and is not good for you. Excessive brushing i.e. brushing more than 3-4 times is also bad for you. You must always observe a balance in brushing which keeps your dental health healthy.FIX  Since unlearning a bad brushing habit maybe harder the easier solution is to switch from a manual to an automatic brush. Going automatic by using a battery operated brush is recommended since it takes the guesswork out of brushing.It may take a while to get adjusted to but like so many other things which are designed to make life easier automatic brushes make dental hygiene very easy and can even reduce the frequency of your dental visits.SUPPLEMENT YOUR BRUSHING                                                      Of course, brushing your teeth is only a part of a complete dental care routine.Mouth wash twice a dayYou should always rinse your mouth and keep it cleaned; otherwise, the germs from the teeth will stay on.              Clean between teeth daily with floss. Tooth decay-causing bacteria still linger between teeth where toothbrush bristles can’t reach. This helps remove plaque and food particles from between the teeth and under the gum line.Eat a balanced diet and limit between-meal snacks.Visit your dentist regularly for professional cleanings and oral exams.Got some questions? Ask us & comment below; we will answer as soon as possible.

Demystifying Orthodontics: All That You Need to Know!

Dr. Vivek Misra, Dentist
What is Orthodontics ?Orthodontia, also known as orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics, was the first specialty created in the field of dentistry. An orthodontist is a specialist who has undergone special training in a dental school or college after they have graduated in dentistry.Orthodontics is a specialised branch of dentistry that diagnoses, prevents and treats problems in the alignment of teeth and jaws.the 'orthodontics' literally means 'straight teeth'.Orthodontists usually use braces and clear aligners to set the patient's teeth. Orthodontists work on reconstructing the entire face rather than focusing only on teeth.Braces for All AgesFor childrenWhile there is no exact age for children to begin orthodontic treatment, the American Association of Orthodontists recommends a visit to the orthodontist around age seven. Early treatment allows your orthodontist to correct and guide your child’s jaw, create more space for crowded teeth, avoid the need for extractions later in life, and correct thumb sucking and minor speech problems. There are a few things to watch for, such as crowded or misplaced teeth, difficulty chewing or biting, mouth breathing, thumb sucking, or popping jaws, that may mean your child needs to see an orthodontist.For teensBraces are no longer as scary as many teens may think. In fact, braces today come in a variety of styles, materials, and colors, which makes life with them much easier, more comfortable, and even more stylish than in the past. There are several treatment options to choose from, including traditional metal, ceramic, and invisible braces.Treatment times can vary, depending on how quickly your body responds and how much work is needed to give you the show-stopping smile you desire. Regardless of the type of braces you choose, it is important to avoid sticky, hard, or chewy foods, because they may damage your braces and prolong your treatment time.For adultsOrthodontic treatment is no longer just for teens! In fact, the  Orthodontists association state that one in five orthodontic patients is over the age of 21! Many adults are choosing to receive treatment because they understand the importance of maintaining their health, and they want to feel better about their appearance.Today’s orthodontic treatment options offer a variety of braces and appliances, such as clear braces, self-ligating braces, lingual braces, and clear aligners, that are comfortable, aesthetic, and customized to meet your needs. Remember, a straight smile isn’t just beautiful; it will help you maintain the health of your teeth for life!