Articles on human tooth

Do's & Dont's After Tooth Removal

Dr. Swasti Jain, Dentist
1. TO CONTROL BLEEDINGBite firmly on the gauze for 45 minutes to an hour.Applying pressure over an extended period is the key.Don't keep changing the gauze, and don't chew on it. Just put it in place and close down, for the full 45 minutes to an hour.The blood clot that forms in the tooth's empty socket is an important part of the healing process, so be careful not to do anything that will dislodge or disrupt it.Avoid vigorous rinsing or spitting. - These activities may dislodge the clot.Don't disturb your extraction site. - Don't touch or poke at it with your finger. Don't explore it with your tongue.Don't consume hot liquids and foods. - Hot items, especially liquids like soup, tea, and coffee, tend to dissolve blood clots.You should avoid smoking or using a straw (these activities create suction). Also, don't blow your nose. And if you need to sneeze, sneeze with your mouth open. (See below for more details.)It's best to avoid strenuous work or exercise. 2. SWELLINGIt's common and normal for some degree of swelling to occur after having a tooth pulled. The amount that ultimately forms is typically proportional to the extent of the surgery that has taken place. That means:After very simple extractions you may notice very little, possibly none.With more involved cases (longer, more difficult extractions or the removal of several teeth) you may notice a pronounced enlargement, possibly involving a large portion of your face.Generally speaking, the amount of swelling that forms can be minimized via the application of ice packs on the outside of your face over the area where your surgery was performed, starting immediately upon the completion of your procedure.3. AVOID SMOKINGPeople who smoke tend to experience a higher level of complications with extraction site healing. That means if you can avoid smoking for the first 24 hours (and preferably 48 hours and longer) after having your tooth pulled, it will be to your benefit.4. AVOID BLOWING NOSEThat's because doing so can create a pressure difference between your mouth (via the recesses of your extracted tooth's socket) and your sinuses that might be great enough to disrupt what in some cases may be just a paper-thin layer of bone separating the two.5. EATING Take soft and cold diet for first 24 hrs.Try chewing from the other side of the extraction site.6. NUMBNESSAfter your tooth has been pulled, some portion of your mouth will still be numb, possibly for some hours. Besides just the area immediately surrounding your extraction site, this will likely include some aspect of your lips, cheeks or tongue too.This sensory loss can result in accidents. As examples ...You might unknowingly bite your lip or tongue while chewing, possibly even repeatedly.You might not be able to test hot (temperature) foods and beverages adequately, which could result in burns.

Myths and Facts About Wisdom Tooth

Dr. Vijita Mehta, Dentist
Myth 1: Wisdom teeth must always be removed.  Fact: Wisdom teeth don’t always cause trouble when they do show up. In fact, there may not even be a need for extraction if they are healthy and properly aligned. However, wisdom teeth often pose complications such as partial eruption then they only partially break through the gums. This allows bacteria to form around the tooth and result in pain, jaw stiffness, swelling, and other dangerous complications.Myth 2: We get our wisdom teeth when our other adult teeth come in. Fact: Wisdom teeth don’t come in until age 17-25, which is commonly known as the “age of wisdom”.  But that’s only if they come out at all. About 35% of us never get wisdom teeth!Myth 3: Ice cream and milkshakes are great after an extraction. Fact: The fact that they’re soft makes it easy to ingest and the fact they’re cold helps soothe the pain and the swelling. However, it’s important not to use a straw because suction can dislodge the clots resulting from the surgery.Myth 4: It is best to remove wisdom teeth before starting orthodontic treatment. Fact: This varies from case to case. While there is some concern that wisdom teeth may cause the other teeth to move, thus hindering the effects of the treatment.Myth 5: You can tell if you have wisdom teeth. Fact: Not being able to see your wisdom teeth does not mean they’re not there. That’s because wisdom teeth can be enclosed within the soft tissue or the jawbone. Therefore, an x-ray must be taken   to reveal any hidden teeth, as well as any potential problems with their growth.

Infected Wisdom Tooth Home Remedies

Dr. Himani Sanwaria, Dentist
I will share with you, my recommendations I give to patients before I can schedule them for wisdom tooth disimpaction surgery. These recommendations work well for decades but I will also give you a secret weapon to tip the skills in your favour even more. But what can you do in the short run before your appointment to have wisdom teeth removed? Most dentists will prescribe antibiotics to kill those bacteria that you can’t reach to brush, floss and rinse away. This can be a great idea in the short term but not so wise in the long run. In case you have not read the headline after headline about the overuse of antibiotics being the cause of superbug infections, then let me catch you up. Superbugs are those bacteria that can survive even the strongest of antibiotics. These bugs can lead to pneumonia, urinary tract infections, kidney infections, bladder infections, or even blood infections. So are you sure you wanna play the antibiotics card everytime your body gets a little localized infection? I never take antibiotics unless I know my body’s immune system absolutely needs that extra help. Wisdom tooth infection is almost never life threatening. Because it is a local infection that the body almost always gets control over a week or two. Your surgeon can almost never get you in for extraction during that time frame. Here are the home remedies I always recommend:Mildly brush the infected gums with a soft toothbrush to remove as much plaque or food debris as you can.Floss properly well behind your second molar. Now that’s usually the tooth farthest back in your mouth that you can fully see.Make a warm salt water solution that mimics the body’s fluid. You make that with half a teaspoon of salt dissolved in eight-ounce cup of very warm water. You can swish hard with this to try and break some of the plaque and food debris that might have escaped your brushing and flossing.After rinsing continuously hold that warm water over the affected area until it cools down usually about 30 seconds or so. This can help reduce swelling up to tissues by a process called osmosis. Until a few years ago those recommendations helped all but the most extreme cases until I could get them in for surgery to remove the wisdom teeth to alter the plaque-trapping circumstance since then I have felt one more tool, the secret weapon, rinsing properly with electrolyzed oxidising water or EO water is that weapon. Because it’s special ability to kill every bacteria, virus and single cell organism with which it comes in contact for a reasonable period of time. 30 seconds for most bacteria and up to 2 minutes for bacilli serious, another food poisoning bacteria. The fact that your water kills all single cell life forms which have been known for decades but its acidic pH can cause damage to materials that are affected badly by strong acids. Your teeth qualify as a material damage by this acid if and only if you use it incorrectly.

Childhood Cavities - Early Tooth Loss

Dr. Swasti Jain, Dentist
NURSING BOTTLE CARIES is a  dental problem that develops in infants, especially infants that are put to bed with a bottle containing a sweet liquid. Baby bottle tooth decay is also called nursing-bottle caries and bottle-mouth syndrome. Bottles containing liquids such as milk, formula, fruit juices, sweetened drink mixes, and sugar water continuously bathe an infant's mouth with sugar. The bacteria in the mouth use this sugar to produce acid that destroys the child's teeth. The upper front teeth are typically the ones most severely damaged; the lower front teeth are protected to some degree by the tongue. Pacifiers dipped in sugar, honey, corn syrup, or other sweetened liquids also contribute to baby bottle tooth decay. The first signs of damage are chalky white spots or lines across the teeth. As decay progresses, the damage to the child's teeth becomes more obvious.Damage caused by baby bottle tooth decay is often not diagnosed until the child has a severe problem, because many parents do not schedule regular dental exams for their small children. It is recommended that a child's first trip to the dentist be before one year of age and that trips to the dentist occur regularly every six months after that.In cases of baby bottle tooth decay, the dentist must assess the extent of the damage before deciding on the treatment method. If the problem is caught early, the teeth involved can be treated with fluoride, followed by changes in the infant's feeding habits and better oral hygiene . Primary teeth with obvious decay in the enamel that has not yet progressed to the pulp need to be protected with stainless steel crowns. Fillings are not usually an option in small children because of the small size of their teeth and the concern of recurrent decay. When the decay has advanced to the pulp, pulling the tooth is often the treatment of choice.

Looking Old? Blame It on Tooth Loss !

Dr. Kamlesh Kothari, Dentist
DID U KNOW that jaw bones start disappearing once one loses teeth. This is the main reason of the classical OLD AGE LOOK.This is natures way of saying , IF U DON'T USE IT.What causes this?Individuals lose teeth due to various reasons and tooth loss makes them look old. Aesthetics are an important part of the overall looks of the patients irrespective of their age. Most people become conscious about their looks when they have teeth missing from their mouth, as these areas are  noticeable when the individual talks, smiles or laughs. There are various reasons because of which teeth can be lost :Accidents including road traffic accidents Recommended extraction of teeth for any orthodontic treatmentDamaged teethTeeth which cannot be saved or restoredBone resorption is the primary effect seen after the loss of the teeth from the respective areas. Bone resorption is prominent in the patients who have lost front teeth. Those who have lost the back teeth can experience difficulty in the chewing of the food as well as at the time of the opening and closing of the jaw. Dislocations of the temporomandibular joints is quite common in such patients who have noticeable bone resorption after the lone of the natural teeth. In the absence of teeth, the bone cells in the respective areas are not stimulated to keep producing bone in the particular area of the jaw. This leads to resorption of bone without having bone production going on, on the side.The skeletal pattern of the face will also be affected in the absence of teeth. This can be commonly seen in the patients who are of elderly age group. As these patients have more than one teeth missing in most of the cases, the looks are compromised with eventual sagging of the face starting from months of the loss of the teeth, eventually leading to a "witch's chin look"Witch's Chin look - the dental area is fully collapsed due to poor bone support.Most  individuals want to compensate the loss of the natural teeth whether it’s timely or untimely loss. There are treatments which lead to long term benefits to the patients in the form of correction of the aesthetics and improvement of their features as well as improved functionality. The best treatment is dental implants which are in great demand among the patients who are much concerned regarding their facial aesthetics and want the best treatment to retain a young and healthy look.

Root Canal Treatment Saves Tooth

Dr. Amit Berani, Dentist
Are you in immense need to treat your aching tooth? Has your endodontist suggested you root canal treatment for the same? Don’t worry you’re not alone. Dentists save millions of teeth by each year by endodontic treatment. Here is how root canal therapy can relieve your tooth pain and bring an attractive smile on your face.Eradicating Decayed PulpInside the tooth there is a soft tissue called the pulp which helps to grow the root of your tooth. Bust when your tooth is fully developed it can survive without the pulp. The tooth gets its nourishment by the tissues surrounding it. But when this pulp becomes inflamed or infected, root canal therapy comes into picture. Root canal deals with eradicating this decayed pulp from inside your tooth.What If Ignored?The pulp infection can be caused due to deep decay, faulty crowns or a crack in the tooth, repeated dental procedures etc. If pulp inflammation is left untreated, it can lead to dental abscess or unbearable pain.How To Save The Tooth?Endodontic treatment includes the removal of infected pulp. After cleaning and disinfecting your tooth a rubber-like material called gutta-percha is used to fill and seal the cavity in your tooth. At last this sealing is covered with a crown or filling for protection. Soon after this restoration, the tooth continues to function like any other tooth.Root canal therapy not only saves your tooth but also offers the following advantages: Efficient chewingNormal biting force and sensationNatural appearanceProtects other teeth from excessive wear or strain

Everything About Sweets and Tooth Decay

Dr. Swasti Jain, Dentist
You've probably heard it all your life: Eating sweets will rot your teeth. But while a diet high in sugar certainly promotes the formation of cavities (as well as other medical problems, such as obesity), sugar itself isn't the real culprit behind tooth decay.Dental cavities — also known as caries, the Latin word for "decay" — are formed when bacteria living in the mouth digest carbohydrate debris left on the teeth after you eat. Such debris might include the refined sugars found in cookies, candy and other treats, but can also come from healthy foods like whole grains, vegetables and fruits.When digesting these carbohydrates, bacteria in your mouth produce an acid that combines with saliva to form that nasty stuff your dentist warned you about: plaque.It's plaque — not sugar — that leads to tooth decay. Plaque starts building up after every meal, and if it isn't brushed away frequently, it can erode the hard, outer enamel of a tooth, resulting in tiny holes in the tooth's surface. These holes mark the first stage of cavity formation.And those tiny holes can do a lot of damage if left untreated. Eventually, the acid and bacteria in plaque can eat through the other layers of your teeth, as well — from the softer layer of teeth under the enamel, known as dentin, to the third layer (the pulp), which contains your teeth's blood vessels and nerves. Cavities affecting the pulp of a tooth, as well as the bone supporting tooth, can cause severe toothaches, sensitivity, pain when eating and abscesses in the mouth.Ultimately, sugar is just one of many carbs that can land you in the dentist's chair, but that doesn't mean you should trade in your apples for candy corn just yet. The way you consume food is just as important as the kinds of food you eat. For example, chugging a can of soda actually does less damage to your teeth than sipping on a soda throughout the day, because the acid created by mouth bacteria sticks around for 30 minutes after you eat or drink. So every time you munch another chip or take a sip of soda, you restart the plaque-production clock and increase your risk of developing cavities.

What After Tooth Removal ??

Dr. Swasti Jain, Dentist
After tooth removal and extraction, you should be very careful about the wound in your mouth. Most activities are geared toward the avoidance of dislodging the blood clot on the wound, which would result in a painful condition called dry socket. For the first 24 hours after surgery, you should rest. Do not drink through a straw or spitAlso, in the first 24 hours, you should not eat anything but very soft foods (like pudding), not drink certain beverages (such as those with caffeine, alcohol, carbonation, or are hot), rinse your mouth or brush your teeth, or smoke.You should begin taking pain medication as soon as you feel the local anesthetic wearing off.  After 24 hours, you can start to resume your normal activities, brush your teeth (gently), rinse your mouth with a salt water rinse every two hours and after meals, and eat semisoft foods once you feel ready. You should also not drink with a straw, eat spicy or hard foods, or chew tobacco for at least a week.You may experience bruising, pain, and bleeding around the area of the extracted tooth. This is normal in the first few days, but if it persists, you should let your oral surgeon or dentist know, as you could be experiencing complications.Swelling around the mouth, cheeks, eyes and sides of the face is not uncommon after wisdom tooth removal. This is the body’s normal reaction to surgery and eventual repair. The swelling will not be noticeable until the day following surgery and will not reach its maximum until two or three days later. The key to preventing swelling is to start icing right after surgery and keep at it all day. Two baggies filled with ice, or ice packs should be applied to the sides of the face where surgery was performed. The ice packs should be left on continuously while you are awake. Make sure you are also aware of whether you need to make an appointment to have your stitches removed. Partial dentures, flippers, or full dentures should not be worn immediately after surgery and for at least ten days.

Choosing Electric Tooth Brush

Dr. Himani Sanwaria, Dentist
Electric toothbrush provides a different kind of experience compared to brushing with a regular toothbrush or manual toothbrush. With a powered toothbrush, all you need to do is place the toothbrush at a 45° angle and let the toothbrush do all the work. An electric toothbrush is ideal for people who suffer from arthritis, carpal tunnel syndrome, and any other painful or movement-restricting conditions. Since the electric toothbrush’s rotating head does all the work, the user is exempt from constantly applying effort with their wrists and hands; making dental care a much easier task.Choosing the appropriate electric toothbrush for you is easy for you if you have knowledge about the different types available in the market. The three major types of electric toothbrushes you can choose from are:Vibrating: This is used just like the manual toothbrushRotating-oscillating: This toothbrush is so easy to use. Since it is already rotating, you just have to move it from tooth to tooth. The effort on brushing is less compared to the vibrating typeSide to side: These move side to side at a very high speed that it makes them vibrate against your teeth.Complete action: These are electronic toothbrushes that have dual heads. The first head rotates while the other moves from side to side.Do you want to change your toothbrush from manual to electric? Here are the things you have to look for:Free case protector that comes along with it. It ensures that your toothbrush will be safeguarded against having dents and cracks during travelling.Small head: This will enable you to reach the back molar teeth easily, which are prone to have tartar deposition, as well as force you to brush one tooth at a time.Long lasting battery life. You want your toothbrush to work for a longer time. Frequent charging of batteries can be a hassle for some individuals in this fast pace life.Comfortable movements: It does not matter which type of electric toothbrush to pick. Be sure that you are comfortable with whatever action of toothbrush you want to pick. Ask your dentist which one they recommend and why.Electric toothbrushes are home care instrument for disease control and help make your oral hygiene routine more effective. Few studies have proven electric toothbrushes remove significantly more plaque compared to manual toothbrushes and are better at combating gum disease. Despite the studies, your dental health will remain healthy (despite which type of toothbrush you use) as long as you consistently take care of your teeth.

What After Tooth Removal ?

Dr. Swasti Jain, Dentist
After tooth removal and extraction, you should be very careful about the wound in your mouth. Most activities are geared toward the avoidance of dislodging the blood clot on the wound, which would result in a painful condition called dry socket. For the first 24 hours after surgery, you should rest. Do not drink through a straw or spitAlso, in the first 24 hours, you should not eat anything but very soft foods (like pudding), not drink certain beverages (such as those with caffeine, alcohol, carbonation, or are hot), rinse your mouth or brush your teeth, or smoke.You should begin taking pain medication as soon as you feel the local anesthetic wearing off.  After 24 hours, you can start to resume your normal activities, brush your teeth (gently), rinse your mouth with a salt water rinse every two hours and after meals, and eat semisoft foods once you feel ready. You should also not drink with a straw, eat spicy or hard foods, or chew tobacco for at least a week.You may experience bruising, pain, and bleeding around the area of the extracted tooth. This is normal in the first few days, but if it persists, you should let your oral surgeon or dentist know, as you could be experiencing complications.Swelling around the mouth, cheeks, eyes and sides of the face is not uncommon after wisdom tooth removal. This is the body’s normal reaction to surgery and eventual repair. The swelling will not be noticeable until the day following surgery and will not reach its maximum until two or three days later. The key to preventing swelling is to start icing right after surgery and keep at it all day. Two baggies filled with ice, or ice packs should be applied to the sides of the face where surgery was performed. The ice packs should be left on continuously while you are awake. Make sure you are also aware of whether you need to make an appointment to have your stitches removed. Partial dentures, flippers, or full dentures should not be worn immediately after surgery and for at least ten days.