Articles on world oral health day

Do You Know the Importance of Oral Health?

Dr. Ruchit Thakar, Dentist
Regular dentist visits can do more than keep your smile attractive – they can tell dentists a lot about your overall health, including whether or not you may be developing a disease like diabetes.New research suggests that the health of your mouth mirrors the condition of your body as a whole. For example, when your mouth is healthy, chances are your overall health is good, too. On the other hand, if you have poor oral health, you may have other health problems.Research also shows that good oral health may actually prevent certain diseases from occurring.Gum disease and health complicationsAccording to the Academy of General Dentistry, there is a relationship between gum (periodontal) disease and health complications such asa stroke and heart disease. Women with gum disease also show higher incidences of pre-term, low birth-weight babies.Other research shows that more than 90 percent of all systemic diseases (diseases involving many organs or the whole body) have oral manifestations, including swollen gums, mouth ulcers, dry mouth and excessive gum problems. Such diseases include:DiabetesLeukemiaOral cancerPancreatic cancerHeart diseaseKidney diseaseSince most people have regular oral examinations, their dentist may be the first health care provider to diagnose a health problem in its early stages.Poor oral health can lead to other problemsIf you don't take care of your teeth and gums, your poor oral hygiene can actually lead to other health problems, including:Oral and facial pain. According to the Office of the Surgeon General, this pain may be largely due to infection of the gums that support the teeth and can lead to tooth loss. Gingivitis, an early stage of gum disease, and advanced gum disease affect more than 75 percent of the population.Problems with the heart and other major organs. Mouth infections can affect major organs. For example, the heart and heart valves can become inflamed by bacterial endocarditis, a condition that affects people with heart disease or anyone with damaged heart tissue.Digestion problems. Digestion begins with physical and chemical processes in the mouth,and problems here can lead to intestinal failure, irritable bowel syndrome and other digestive disorders.What you can do-Seeing a dentist regularly helps to keep your mouth in top shape and allows your dentist to watch for developments that may point to other health issues. A dental exam can also detect poor nutrition and hygiene, growth and development problems and improper jaw alignment. Provide your dentist with a complete medical history and inform him or her of any recent health developments, even if they seem unrelated to your oral health.At home, you can practice good oral hygiene:Brush for two to three minutes, at least twice a day, with fluoridated toothpaste.Floss daily to remove plaque from places your toothbrush can't reach.Eat a healthy diet to provide the nutrients necessary (vitamins A and C, in particular) to prevent gum disease.Avoid cigarettes and smokeless tobacco, which may contribute to gum disease and oral cancer.Exercise preventive care and schedule regular dental checkups — the surest way to detect early signs of periodontal disease.

Oral Health Is A Window To Your Overall Health!

Dr. Gauri Mulay Arbatti, Dentist
Did you know that your oral health can offer clues about your overall health — or that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body? Understand the connection between oral health and overall health and what you can do to protect yourself.What's the connection between oral health and overall health?Like many areas of the body, your mouth is teeming with bacteria — most of them are harmless. Normally the body's natural defenses and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and flossing, can keep these bacteria under control. However, without proper oral hygiene, bacteria can reach levels that might lead to oral infections, such as tooth decay and gum disease.In addition, certain medications — such as decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers and diuretics — can reduce saliva flow. Saliva washes away food and neutralizes acids produced by bacteria in the mouth, helping to protect you from microbial invasion or overgrowth that may lead to a disease.Studies also suggest that oral bacteria and the inflammation associated with periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease — might play a role in some diseases. In addition, certain diseases, such as diabetes and HIV/AIDS, can lower the body's resistance to infection, making oral health problems more severe.What conditions may be linked to oral health?Your oral health might affect, be affected by, or contribute to various diseases and conditions, including:Endocarditis: Endocarditis is an infection of the inner lining of your heart (endocardium). Endocarditis typically occurs when bacteria or other germs from another part of your body, such as your mouth, spread through your bloodstream and attach to damaged areas in your heart.Cardiovascular disease: Some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke might be linked to the inflammation and infections that oral bacteria can cause.Pregnancy and birth: Periodontitis has been linked to low birth weight.Diabetes: Diabetes reduces the body's resistance to infection — putting the gums at risk. Gum disease appears to be more frequent and severe among people who have diabetes. Research shows that people who have gum disease have a harder time controlling their blood sugar levels.HIV/AIDS: Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS.Osteoporosis: Osteoporosis — which causes bones to become weak and brittle — might be linked with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss.Other conditions: Other conditions that might be linked to oral health include Sjogren's syndrome — an immune system disorder that causes dry mouth — and eating disorders.Because of these potential links, be sure to tell your dentist if you're taking any medications or have had any changes in your overall health — especially if you've had any recent illnesses or you have a chronic condition, such as diabetes.      4. How can I protect my oral health?          To protect your oral health, practice good oral hygiene every day. For example:Brush your teeth at least twice a day.Floss daily.Eat a healthy diet and limit between-meal snacks.Replace your toothbrush every three to four months or sooner if bristles are frayed.Schedule regular dental checkups.Also, contact your dentist as soon as an oral health problem arises. Remember, taking care of your oral health is an investment in your overall health.

Oral Health: A Window to Your Overall Health

Dr. Nirav D Shah, Dentist
Years ago, a physician who suspected heart disease would probably not refer the patient to a gum specialist. The same went for diabetes,pregnancy, or just about any other medical condition. Times have changed. The past 5 to 10 years have seen ballooning interest in possible links between mouth health and body health.Your Mouth, the Gateway to Your BodyTo understand how the mouth can affect the body, it helps to understand what can go wrong in the first place. Bacteria that builds up on teeth make gums prone to infection. The immune system moves in to attack the infection and the gums become inflamed. The inflammation continues unless the infection is brought under control.Over time, inflammation and the chemicals it releases eat away at the gums and bone structure that hold teeth in place. The result is severegum disease, known as periodontitis. Inflammation can also cause problems in the rest of the body.What's the connection between oral health and overall health?Like many areas of the body, your mouth is teeming with bacteria — most of them harmless. Normally the body's natural defenses and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and flossing, can keep these bacteria under control. However, without proper oral hygiene, bacteria can reach levels that might lead to oral infections, such as tooth decay and gum disease.In addition, certain medications — such as decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers and diuretics — can reduce saliva flow. Saliva washes away food and neutralizes acids produced by bacteria in the mouth, helping to protect you from microbial invasion or overgrowth that might lead to disease.Studies also suggest that oral bacteria and the inflammation associated with periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease — might play a role in some diseases. In addition, certain diseases, such as diabetes and HIV/AIDS, can lower the body's resistance to infection, making oral health problems more severe.Oral Health and DiabetesThe working relationship between diabetes and periodontitis may be the strongest of all the connections between the mouth and body. Inflammation that starts in the mouth seems to weaken the body’s ability to control blood sugar. People with diabetes have trouble processing sugar because of a lack of insulin, the hormone that converts sugar into energy.Diabetes reduces the body's resistance to infection — putting the gums at risk. Gum disease appears to be more frequent and severe among people who have diabetes. Research shows that people who have gum disease have a harder time controlling their blood sugar levels.Oral Health and Heart DiseaseThough the reasons are not fully understood, it’s clear that gum disease and heart disease often go hand in hand. Up to 91% of patients withheart disease have periodontitis, compared to 66% of people with noheart disease. The two conditions have several risk factors in common, such as smoking, unhealthy diet, and excess weight. And some suspect that periodontitis has a direct role in raising the risk for heart diseaseas well.Oral Health and PregnancyBabies born too early or at a low birth weight often have significant health problems, including lung conditions, heart conditions, and learning disorders. While many factors can contribute to premature or low birth weight deliveries, researchers are looking at the possible role of gum disease. Infection and inflammation in general seem to interfere with a fetus’ development in the womb.Though men have periodontitis more often than women do, hormonal changes during pregnancy can increase a woman’s risk. For the best chance of a healthy pregnancy.Oral Health and OsteoporosisOsteoporosis and periodontitis have an important thing in common,bone loss. The link between the two, however, is controversial. Cram points out that osteoporosis affects the long bones in the arms and legs, whereas gum disease attacks the jawbone. Others point to the fact that osteoporosis mainly affects women, whereas periodontitis is more common among men.Though a link has not been well established, some studies have found that women with osteoporosis have gum disease more often than those who do not. Researchers are testing the theory that inflammation triggered by periodontitis could weaken bone in other parts of the body.Oral Health and Other ConditionsThe impact of oral health on the body is a relatively new area of study. Some other mouth-body connections under current investigation include:Rheumatoid Arthritis. Treating periodontal disease has been shown to reduce pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis.Lung Conditions. Periodontal disease may make pneumonia andchronic obstructive pulmonary disease worse, possibly by increasing the amount of bacteria in the lungs.Obesity. Two studies have linked obesity to gum disease. It appears that periodontitis progresses more quickly in the presence of higher body fat.The Bottom Line on Oral HealthOne thing is clear: the body and mouth are not separate. "Your body can affect your mouth and likewise, your mouth can affect your body," says McClain. "Taking good care of your teeth and gums can really help you live well longer." This means brushing twice a day, flossing once a day, and going for regular dental cleanings and check-ups.

Conditions That Can Harm Oral Health

Dr. Ishwari Bhirud, Dentist
 Medical conditions that can harm your mouthFrom diabetes to stomach ulcers, a number of illnesses can wreak havoc on your oral health.Acid attack!Carbonated beverages, fruit juice and acidic foods can harm teeth. Acid in our food can cause enamel to wear away.Aloe vera soothes mouth soresAloe vera can treat common oral health conditions, including cold sores and fever blisters (outside of the mouth) and canker sores (in the mouth), according to the Academy of General Dentistry.Are oral health issues genetic?Dental problems can run in the family. Here's a look at five oral health issues that have a genetic link.Anxiety disorders contribute to oral health problemsPeople are anxious about going to the dentist for different reasons, including worrying about the effectiveness, feeling dentist is rushed, neglecting concerns, anticipation of pain, negative past experiences, or atmosphere.Causes of "dry mouth" and how to relieve itDid you know that medications are the most common cause of dry mouth? Learn how to relieve the symptoms.Cavities are not just for kidsThe threat of cavities is something that you never outgrow. The contributing factors may be different for adults (receding gums, weakening fillings) and children, but cavities can be a problem at any age.Diabetes and oral healthStudies show that diabetics are more susceptible to the development of oral infections and periodontal disease. Oral infections tend to be more severe in diabetic patients than non-diabetic patients.Don’t give in to gum diseaseGum disease can lead to tooth loss. Regular brushing, flossing, dental exams and diet can help keep gums healthy.Fighting bad breathBad breath or halitosis is something almost all of us suffer at one time or another. Possible causes to watch are infected gums, dirty teeth, foul tongue, empty stomach, and smoking.Sensitive teeth: Do hot and cold bother you?If a taste of ice cream or a sip of coffee registers tooth pain, you may have sensitive teeth. This condition is common and it is treatable.Jaw-dropping facts about TMJ/TMD disordersMany Americans experience pain related to their temporomandibular joints (TMJ). Learn the symptoms of TMJ/TMD and how your dentist may be able to treat them.Nail biting can lead to bruxismBruxism, or teeth grinding, is the unintentional grinding or clenching of teeth that may cause facial pain. Your dentist can determine whether you may have bruxism and, if so, can suggest the best method of treatment.Oral cancerYour dentist can perform a screening for oral cancer, which is most frequently found on the tongue, the floor of the mouth, soft palate tissues in back of the tongue, lips, and gums. Early detection and treatment is essential.Overbrushing: Watch out for too much of a good thingBrushing too long, using too firm a toothbrush or brushing improperly can injure your teeth and gums.'Tooth squeeze' — Your teeth under pressure.Your teeth can feel pressure too. "Tooth squeeze," or barodontalgia, is tooth pain caused by air or water pressure in extreme environments.Reference: www.care32dental.com

Oral Health for Overall Health

Dr. (Maj) Varun Nischal, Dentist
The connection between oral/dental health and overall health is well established. There are several ways in which neglected oral hygiene can affect your general health. The following are some examples:HEART DISEASE: Those with advanced gum disease/Periodontitis are at an increased risk of heart attack. The bacteria present in millions in the plaque and calculus deposits in the mouth can travel through the blood stream and cause cardiovascular problems. STROKE: Those with adult periodontitis are at increased risk of stroke.UNCONTROLLED DIABETES: Diabetes can alter the bacterial environment in the mouth contributing to overgrowth of harmful bacteria. Smokers with diabetes increase their risk of tooth loss by 20 times.RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS: Inhaling bacteria present in dental plaque through mouth and throat can lead to pneumonia and other lung conditions. PRETERM/LOW BIRTH WEIGHT INFANTS: Hormonal and vascular changes during pregnancy leads to increased inflammation/swelling of gums commonly in 2nd-8th month of pregnancy. In addition, these oral microbes can also cross the placental barrier exposing the fetus to infection.SEVERE OSTEOPENIA: Reduction in bone mass (osteopenia) is associated with gum disease and related tooth loss especially in postmenopausal women.THE SOLUTION: SIMPLE, ECONOMICAL & EASY!Brush gently twice daily for strong teeth.Floss daily (after every meal) to keep your gums healthy. Brushing does not clean the food particles stuck in between teeth and gums.Pay a visit to your dentist every 6 months to monitor any budding problem at an early stage. As it has been rightly said, "Nip the evil in the Bud."Get regular professional cleaning/scaling done (at least twice a year).Never ignore anything unusual in your mouth. Home remedies, pain killers, antibiotics do not repair tooth damage.Eat healthy, stay stress-free and love the gums you're with!

Healthy Smile, Healthy You: The Importance of Oral Health

Dr. Ishwari Bhirud, Dentist
Regular dentist visits can do more than keep your smile attractive – they can also tell dentists a lot about your overall health, including whether or not you may be at risk for chronic disease.New research suggests that the health of your mouth mirrors the condition of your body as a whole. For example, when your mouth is healthy, chances are your overall health is good, too. On the other hand, if you have poor oral health, you may have other health problems.Research also shows that good oral health may actually prevent certain diseases from occurring.Gum disease and health complicationsAccording to the research in General Dentistry, there is a relationship between gum (periodontal) disease and health complications such as a stroke and heart disease. Women with gum disease also show higher incidences of pre-term, low birth-weight babies.Other research shows that more than 90% of all systemic diseases (diseases involving many organs or the whole body) have oral manifestations, including swollen gums, mouth ulcers, dry mouth and excessive gum problems. Such diseases include:DiabetesLeukemiaOral cancerPancreatic cancerHeart diseaseKidney diseaseSince most people have regular oral examinations, their dentist may be the first health care provider to diagnose a health problem in its early stages.Poor oral health can lead to problemsIf you don't take care of your teeth and gums, your poor oral hygiene can actually lead to other health problems, including:Oral and facial pain. According to the Office of the Surgeon General, this pain may be largely due to infection of the gums that support the teeth and can lead to tooth loss. Gingivitis, an early stage of gum disease, and advanced gum disease affect more than 75% of the U.S. population.Problems with the heart and other major organs. Mouth infections can affect major organs. For example, the heart and heart valves can become inflamed by bacterial endocarditis, a condition that affects people with heart disease or anyone with damaged heart tissue.Digestion problems. Digestion begins with physical and chemical processes in the mouth, and problems here can lead to intestinal failure, irritable bowel syndrome, and other digestive disorders.What you can do...Seeing a dentist regularly helps to keep your mouth in top shape and allows your dentist to watch for developments that may point to other health issues. A dental exam can also detect poor nutrition and hygiene, growth and development problems and improper jaw alignment. Provide your dentist with a complete medical history and inform him or her of any recent health developments, even if they seem unrelated to your oral health.At home, you can practice good oral hygiene:Brush twice a day for at least two minutes, using fluoridated toothpaste.Floss daily to remove plaque from places your toothbrush can't reach.Eat a healthy diet to provide the nutrients necessary (vitamins A and C, in particular) to prevent gum disease.Avoid cigarettes and smokeless tobacco, which are known to contribute to gum disease and oral cancer.Visit the dentist regularly for cleanings and exams. This is one of the most effective ways to detect the early signs of gum disease.

Is Oral Health Linked to General Well Being?

Dr. Shail Jaggi, Dentist
Sometimes I sit and think I’ve seen so many teeth and oral cavities in my life! That its not funny, 18 years of work and approximately 8 hours a day. That’s plenty!But the one thing that fascinated me right from my academic days and continue to fascinate me even today is how sometimes a patients mouth can tell me a story about them!When they say the oral cavity is the window to the body... I couldn’t  agree more with it.Ever wondered why your dentist and most advertisements you see harp on brushing, flossing and plaque reduction and germs!  These terms are actually deeply linked to your overall well being.Wondering How?The Oral Cavity is teeming with millions of bacteria! Most of these are however harmless... unless they increase in proportion where they can take dangerous proportions and cause problems! So the brushing flossing regime is more important than you think... Brush and floss... keep the bacteria under control ,don’t let them multiply and chances are you’re going to lead a much healthier life !Got a Medical Condition?If you suffer from any of the medical conditions listed below you need to be extra careful about your Oral Health Heart Diseases: Research has shown oral bacteria may cause inflammation and infection which may be linked to and cause or aggravate heart diseases ,stroke or clogged arteries.Pregnancy : Regular Dental evaluation and are a must during pregnancy. There are plenty of hormonal changes your body is going through! The gums are the first to get affected. Make sure you don’t have a gum problem. Gum problems can cause premature birth and low birth weight. So make sure you have an impeccable oral condition during those nine months.Endocarditis : Is a condidton where the lining of the heart is damaged. Bacteria travelling from the mouth into the blood stream and onto the damaged heart wall can cause irreversible damage. Sometimes, life threatening. Make sure your dentist is aware of a situation like this. Patients with Endocarditis need to be treated with utmost care and under antibiotic coverDiabetes : You need to maintain very good Oral Care if you’re a diabetic patient . Research shows the gums are more prone to infection, bone loss is more rapid and healing with even routine dental procedures can be greatly delayed leading to early loss of teeth and more complications with dental surgical workHIV/AIDS :These patients are generally more immune compromised and the smallest bit of neglect can cause painful oral sores, non healing ulcers. Good Oral health for these patients is  mandatory not optional.Osteoporosis : If you have osteoporosis chances are there may be some damage to your jaw bones with the medication prescribed for Osteoporosis. Be judicious with all your medication and don’t forget to see your dentist as a routine. The impact of oral health on the body is a relatively new area of study. Some other mouth-body connections under current investigation include:Rheumatoid Arthritis. Treating periodontal disease has been shown to reduce pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis.Lung Conditions. Periodontal disease may make pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease worse, possibly by increasing the amount of bacteria in the lungs.Obesity. Two studies have linked obesity to gum disease. It appears that periodontitis progresses more quickly in the presence of higher body fat.Quick Tips to Protect Your Oral HealthBrushing /Flossing : Keep the bacterial activity under control with brushing and flossing however clichéd it may sound. If you suffer from a condition you need to be even more cautious and careful.Medications –certain medications — such as decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers, diuretics and antidepressants — can reduce saliva flow.Saliva washes away food and neutralizes acids produced by bacteria in the mouth, helping to protect you from microbial invasion or overgrowth that might lead to disease.Drink plenty of water if salivary flow is reduced …its helps to keep your oral cavity squeaky clean !.Illness – Just recovered from an illness, sinusitis, cold? hange your tooth brush. Research suggests you could be re introducing all the bacteria into your mouth and increasing susceptibilityTobacco /Smoking:  Reduce blood flow to the moth by constricting the blood vessels. Surgical healing in your mouth may get delayed or painful. Tobacco and smoking are an absolute no.I'm hoping you get more serious with brushing. Till I see you again next week, I'll sign off for now. 

How to Keep Your Teeth Healthy? 10 Tips for Good Oral Health

Dr. Amogh Tanwar, Dentist
1. Brush Regularly – The first and foremost thing a person should do is to brush their teeth regularly. A normal count of 3 times per day would be good. i.e. morning, after meals and after dinner or before going to bed. Also, there are quite a few fluoride products that are available in market which you can use in the night which helps in preventing cavities in the teeth. Make sure your toothbrush has soft bristles, which does not damage your enamel layer, or remove it away. Ask Your Dentist - for the right technique to brush.2. Floss Regularly – This is also a nice and effective way of getting rid of any food particles from the surface of the teeth and the gaps between the teeth. They clean all the grooves of the teeth and prevent tooth decay. Any type of floss can be used for flossing. Ask Your Dentist - how to floss.3. Use Fluoride Oral Rinse – There is a rinse available which helps in preventing decay of the tooth and also helps in strengthening the outer enamel of the teeth. The hypersensitivity of the dentin layers also gets decreased due to rinse. Stannous fluoride dental rinses are available for this purpose. NEVER SWALLOW. Ask Your Dentist - how to rinse.4. Try to avoid Soda and Cola like drinks. As the Cola drinks contain acids like citric acid, and phosphoric acid. They slowly react with the teeth and dissolve them. These drinks have corrosive effect on the teeth.You can have these soft drinks, which are originally hard, but just don’t become addicted to those kind of drinksMilk, Water and Juices – These would be the best substitutes for the Soft drinks. Milk also helps in promoting stronger jaw bones, and also strengthens teeth. Ask Your Dentist - for substitutes.5. Avoid chewing tobacco and smoking – This is one of the major cause for tooth and complete oral tissue damage. The tobacco powder and its smoke causes stains on teeth and they weaken the teeth. Chewing of tobacco can lead to discoloration of teeth and sometimes this tobacco is also responsible for the dangerous oral cancer. So, avoiding tobacco related products is the best. Ask Your Dentist -  how to quit.6. Which Chewable gums? – These are of 2 kinds, One which are specifically made to chew after meals and these help in cleaning of the teeth. And the other gums, are the sweet ones which increases sugar content and attract micro-organisms on to the teeth and they cause decay of the teeth. It would be better to decrease these kind of sweet gums. AskYour Dentist - which one to chew . 7. Avoid Alcohol – Several problems can occur when alcohol is consumed, majorly it effects the oral cavity by causing irritation of the gum, tongue and oral tissues; poor healing after dental surgery; Increase in tooth decay; increased risk towards periodontal (gum) disease.Heavy drinkers have the risk of developing Cancer in mouth. If you are a Drinker - Ask Your Dentist is it affecting your mouth? 8. Healthy Diet Consumption – Having proper and healthy food not only helps in maintaining fitness and getting a perfect body, but also helps in maintaining your oral structures very well. It helps in having mouth well-lubricated and taking extra care of your teeth and gums. You should always have water after intake of food, so temporary cleaning of teeth can be done. Ask Your Dentist - for a healthy Diet.9. Avoid Sticky food – Toffees, candies and chocolate, stick to your teeth and allow bacteria to grow on your teeth which cause decay of your teeth. Ask Your Dentist - for a healthy substitute.10. Visit a Dentist at least twice a year – Go for an oral check up at least every 6 months, to check everything’s fine with your teeth and oral structures. A normal checkup doesn’t cost much, and is very helpful in long run.

Importance of Childhood Oral Hygiene & the Role of Parents

Dr. Nishi Tandon, Dentist
The foundation for healthy permanent teeth in children and teenagers is laid during the first years of life. Poor diet, poor habits of food intake and inadequate tooth brushing habits during the first 2 years of life have been are directly  related to tooth decay in children. The development of caries in primary/milk teeth further increases the risk of developing caries in permanent teeth.Therefore, it is essential to establish a proper oral hygiene routine in the early years to help ensure the development of strong and healthy teeth. Parents should set a daily routine and  help their children understand the importance of oral hygiene. Tooth brushing should be presented as a habit and an integral part of the daily hygiene routine. Children are very sensitive to social stimuli such as praise and affection, and learn best by imitating their parents.Importance of the primary/Milk dentitionMilk teeth start to erupt in children from the age of six months. The primary dentition is complete by approximately two and a half years of age. The milk teeth are more susceptible to caries as it is less densely mineralized than  permanent teeth . Primary teeth play an important role both for chewing and learning to talk.   A full set of teeth is an essential prerequisite in learning correct pronunciation. Primary teeth also play a vital role in the proper alignment and spacing of permanent teeth; it is therefore imperative that they are well cared for and preserved until normal shedding takes place. In addition to good oral hygiene, diet also plays a key role in keeping teeth healthy. In this respect it is not only the quantity of sugar that is important, but also the frequency of consumption. As much as possible, children should be limited in the amount of sweets between meals, especially in the evening or at night.Role of ParentsParents play a key role in helping their children to develop a proper oral hygiene routine in the first years of their life. Parents should  supervise their children’s tooth brushing approximately for the first 12 years, until motor and sensory functions allow the child to routinely perform a proper tooth brushing technique independently. After brushing the teeth for their children for the first 2 years of life, parents will have to use playful motivation to encourage their children to brush their own teeth from about 3 years onwards – the time when children want to brush their teeth alone. parents have to continue supervising the regular brushing efforts of their children. Primary teeth should be brushed twice daily by the parents .

Importance of Maintaining Good Oral Health

CHINDAMANI DENTAL CENTRE
 Maintaining good oral health is one of the most important thing. Everyone wants to have a great smile, which is why good oral hygiene is important. However mouth is the index of your body. Manifestations of systemic diseases are first seen in oral cavity.Oral diseases and systemic diseases are interlinked. Systemic diseases like diabetes, blood pressure, HIV etc, have impact on oral health.Maintaining oral health includes maintaining your gums and teeth.,The tooth structure is embedded in the bone supported by gums around. So improper or poor maintenance of teeth and gums can cause bone loss.Inadequate bone support leads to loosening of teeth from the tooth socket.Poor oral hygiene refers to presence of deposits in and around your gums and on teeth.These deposits are bacterial infections, composed of calcium and phosphate salts.These deposits are referred in technical term as Calculus.It s formed over a course of time when food debris on the tooth is not been cleaned properly.This leads to inflammation of gums causing Gingivitis.Bad breath, bleeding gums, salty taste are symptoms of gum disease.This eventually when left untreated leads to bone loss and tooth weakening. This condition is known as PeriodontitisPractising good oral hygiene not only refers to brushing your teeth twice daily but also flossing, avoiding tobacco and limiting sodas, alcohol, and coffee.In addition to good oral hygiene, diet also plays a key role in keeping teeth healthy.So visit your dentist 6 months once to enhance your smile.