Men are known to be Alexthymics where they prefer bottling up their feelings and not seeking family or social help.

Sex differences in mortality and admissions to hospital emergency departments have been well documented. These studies confirm that males are more at risk than females. Males are more likely to be admitted to an emergency department after accidental injuries, more likely to be admitted with a sporting injury, and more likely to be in a road traffic collision with a higher mortality rate.

Some of these differences may be attributable to cultural and socioeconomic factors: males may be more likely to engage in contact and high risk sports, and males may be more likely to be employed in higher risk occupations. However, sex differences in risk seeking behaviour have been reported from an early age, raising questions about the extent to which these behaviours can be attributed purely to social and cultural differences. However, there is a class of risk—the “idiotic” risk—that is qualitatively different from those associated with, say, contact sports or adventure pursuits such as parachuting. Idiotic risks are defined as senseless risks, where the apparent payoff is negligible or non-existent, and the outcome is often extremely negative and often final.

Men and help seeking behaviors - There is a growing body of research to suggest that men are less likely than women to seek help from health professionals for problems as diverse as depression, substance abuse, physical disabilities and stressful life events. The investigation of men's health-related help seeking behaviour has great potential for improving both men and women's lives and reducing national health costs through the development of responsive and effective interventions.

Studies comparing men and women are inadequate in explaining the processes involved in men's help seeking behaviour. However, the growing body of gender-specific studies highlights a trend of delayed help seeking when they become ill. A prominent theme among middle class men implicates ‘traditional masculine behaviour’ as an explanation for delays in seeking help among men who experience illness. The reasons and processes behind this issue, however, have received limited attention.Conclusions. Principally, the role of masculine beliefs and the similarities and differences between men of differing background requires further attention, particularly given the health inequalities that exist between men of differing socio-economic status and ethnicity. 

Gender Differences in Social Behavior 
What are the causes of sex differences and similarities in behavior? Some causes can be traced to human evolutionary history, especially the ways that the division of labor is influenced by biology and environments.  A human universal--in all known societies--is a division of tasks so that men do some things in society and women do others. The specific activities in a society depend on what tasks can be performed most efficiently by each sex, given men's greater size, strength, and speed and women's bearing and nursing children.The division of labor structures psychological sex differences and similarities. By observing the activities of women and men in their society, people form gender role beliefs. For example, given that women perform more childcare than men in most industrialized societies, women are believed to be especially nurturant and caring. Given that men are more likely than women to hold higher status jobs in industrialized societies, men are believed to be especially dominant and assertive. Gender roles then influence behavior through social and biological processes. In social interaction, people respond more favorably to others who conform to gender role. Women and men also might incorporate gender roles into their own personal identities 

Additionally, hormonal processes support role performance (e.g., testosterone increases in women and men before athletic competitions; Through the research below, we have shown how social roles account for sex differences in group emotional experience and group performance recent research, we explain how women's roles influence menstrual cycles in society along with women's mate preferences. Further more the hormone estrogen protects the women's heart and adds longevity to their lives.