Whole grains deliver superior taste and nutrition. Studies show that eating whole grains instead of refined grains lowers the risk of many chronic diseases. While benefits are most pronounced for those consuming at least 3 servings daily, some studies show reduced risks from as little as one serving daily. Health experts advise everyone – men and women, young and old – that grains are a healthy necessity in every diet, and that it's important to eat


Whole grains include grains like wheat, corn, rice, oats, barley, quinoa, sorghum, spelt, rye – when these foods are eaten in their "whole" form (more on that later). Whole grains even include popcorn!

You may already be eating whole grains. When you munch popcorn in the theater, enjoy a bowl of hot oatmeal, you're probably focusing more on the delicious taste than on the fact that these foods are whole grains.

Choose a whole foods diet!

Whole foods not only provide you with many micro nutrients, antioxidants, photo chemical, carbohydrates, protein, and fat, but they do so in specific ratios and forms. All of which are perfectly coordinated to work synergistically to promote and protect your health. Studies are consistently discovering health benefits linked to whole foods supporting the notion that there are more benefits of whole grains foods than their refined counterparts.


Heart health. Heart-healthy diets rich in whole grain foods can reduce the risk of heart disease.

Reduce cancer risk. Low fat diets rich in fiber-containing grain products, fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of some types of cancer, particularly of the stomach and colon.

Manage diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends whole grain as part of a diabetic diet.

Keep you regular. Fiber from whole grains promotes regularity and keeps the intestines working smoothly to help maintain good digestive health.

Weight management. A growing body of evidence supports that people who eat more whole grain tend to have healthier body weights and gain less weight over time than those who don’t.

NUTRIENTS- indicating the benefits of whole grains:

Grains are important sources of many nutrients, including dietary fiber, several B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, and folate), and minerals (iron, magnesium, and selenium).

Dietary fiber from whole grains or other foods may help reduce blood cholesterol levels and may lower risk of heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Fiber is important for proper bowel function. It helps reduce constipation and diverticulitis. Fiber-containing foods such as whole grains help provide a feeling of fullness with fewer calories.

The B vitamins thiamine, riboflavin, and niacin play a key role in metabolism – they help the body release energy from protein, fat, and carbohydrates. B vitamins are also essential for a healthy nervous system. Many refined grains are enriched with these B vitamins.

Folate (folic acid), another B vitamin, helps the body form red blood cells. Women of childbearing age who may become pregnant should consume adequate folate from foods, and in addition 400 mcg of synthetic folic acid from fortified foods or supplements. This reduces the risk of neural tube defects, spina bifida, and anencephaly during fetal development.

Iron is used to carry oxygen in the blood. Many teenage girls and women in their childbearing years have iron-deficiency. They should eat foods rich in iron along with foods rich in vitamin C, which can improve absorption of iron. Whole and enriched refined grain products are major sources of iron too.

Whole grains are sources of magnesium and selenium. Magnesium is a mineral used in building bones and releasing energy from muscles. Selenium protects cells from oxidation. It is also important for a healthy immune system.