Health Benefits Of Vitamin C

Vitamin C is one of the most important antioxidants . It is very effective at cleaning up molecules that damage cells and tissues . Vitamin C has been studied for cancer prevention and for effects on immunity, heart disease, cataracts and a range of other conditions. Although vitamin C can not cure the common cold, supplements of 1,000 mg per day have been found to decrease the duration and severity of symptoms. In people with HIV, there is some evidence that vitamin C can inhibit replication of the virus in test-tube experiments, but it is unclear what this means in the human body. 

The most important benefit for people with HIV is the widespread antioxidant action of vitamin C. The daily experimental high dose is between 500 mg and 2,000 mg, the upper tolerable limit. Vitamin D is emerging as a very important nutrient, with more diverse functions than just its traditional role in calcium metabolism. Mounting evidence suggests that 1,000 IU per day should be the recommended daily intake. Vitamin D is found in some foods, but these sources generally do not provide enough vitamin D on a daily basis. 

Also, people who live in northern climates (like Canada) probably do not get enough sun exposure to make adequate vitamin D. And the use of sunscreen, which is highly recommended to prevent skin cancer, blocks the skin’s ability to make vitamin D. For people with HIV, vitamin D supplements are a sure way to get the recommended daily allowance. Vitamin D is found in multivitamins and calcium supplements as well as individual vitamin D pills. Look for vitamin D3 ; it is the active form of the vitamin. Be sure to add up all the vitamin D from different supplements to be sure you are not getting too much.