Most of the illnesses and health-related problems are quite easy to detect in children as they show visible discomfort and complain of pain or other symptoms. But when we are talking of eyes, it isn’t that uncomplicated.

As weak eyes rarely show symptoms like pain and easily detectable discomfort, it is difficult to know that your child is going through it. But if he shows any of the below symptoms, or you notice or come across any of these complaints, you should take your child to an eye-specialist at the earliest.

The symptoms/ danger signs are:

  • Inability to read the board at school: If your child’s teacher complains that he/she is unable to read the board from far, you need to take it seriously. Other ways of knowing it are to check if your child is noting down wrong spellings and sentences from the board, which is otherwise unlikely.
  • Sits close to the TV: If your child prefers sitting too close to the television, it might be a sign that he isn’t able to watch it clearly from a distance. You should also notice if they are squeezing their eyes to get a better view when sitting far from the object.
  • Frequently rubs his eyes: Children with eye weakness struggle to see from a distance and put too much pressure on their eyes. The eyes might feel tired and fatigued which causes irritation and leads to frequent rubbing of eyes by the child.
  • Uses fingers to read: If your child is using his fingers to keep a track of where he is reading, he might have an eye-sight problem which is keeping him from syncing the text automatically.
  • Frequent Headaches: Headaches aren’t common with children but if your child is complaining of it, again and again, it might have to do something with his/her eyes. If you doubt, you might need to take them to the paediatrician first, and when recommended (or if you see other signs), take them to the ophthalmologist.

Ignoring eye-related problems can lead to its rapidly worsening. If your children do not get spectacles at the right time, they might have to get heavier ones (with increased pointers) at a later stage.