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High Heart Rate and Dizziness
Hello,I recently got an Oxymeter at home because of all this Covid thing going on, and I have observed that most of the times, my heartbeat is much higher than a normal body, usually around 100+. This is when I just woke up or had a lunch, not after doing exercises. My breathing is normal, but my heart beats upto 100+ at times. This is not every time. I used to check thrice a day, never after doing exercises and atleast once was the heartbeats high. I have also been feeling a light Dizziness kind of, whenever I quickly get up from a lying position. If I get up in a normal way, then it's fine. Other wise, I feel dizziness for a few seconds and I can feel my heart pumping fast, and then it goes off after 2-3 seconds and I am back to normal. I recently lost around 14 kgs of weight in a span of 4 months from March to July. Since July, I have stopped workout due to some reasons and I guess, this started in July or so. initially it was not noticeable, but now I can feel it quite clearly.
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You need to get your CBC, TSH and ECG done
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Palpitation, arrthymia, heart beat or rate problems https://youtu.be/uyedrh9cqhk Palpitations or increased heart beat are feelings or sensations that your heart is pounding or racing. They can be felt in your chest, throat, or neck. You may Have an unpleasant awareness of your own heartbeat or may Feel like your heart skipped or stopped beats The heart's rhythm may be normal or abnormal when you have palpitations. Normally the heart beats 60 to 100 times per minute. The rate may drop below 60 beats per minute in people who exercise routinely or take medicines that slow the heart. If your heart rate is fast (over 100 beats per minute), this is called tachycardia. A heart rate slower than 60 is called bradycardia. An occasional extra heartbeat is known as extrasystole. Sinus tachycardia is a normal increase in the heart rate. How it happens - The sinoatrial (SA) node - the heart's natural pacemaker - sends out electrical signals faster than usual. The heart rate is fast, but the heart beats properly. Causes of sinus tachycardia - A rapid heartbeat may be your body's response to common conditions such as: Fever Anxiety Some medicinal and street drugs Severe emotional distress Fright Strenuous exercise Other causes but less commonly, it may indicate: Anemia (low blood count) Increased thyroid activity Heart muscle damage from heart attack or heart failure Hemorrhage (severe bleeding) You may be having Palpitations, which are feelings or sensations that your heart is pounding or racing. They can be felt in your chest, throat, or neck. You may Have an unpleasant awareness of your own heartbeat or may Feel like your heart skipped or stopped beats The heart's rhythm may be normal or abnormal when you have palpitations. Palpitations are not serious most of the time. Sensations representing an abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia) may be more serious. Your doctor should consider and treat the cause of sinus tachycardia rather than the condition itself. If your rapid heartbeat is a symptom of a more serious or longer term problem, simply slowing the heart rate without checking for underlying reasons could cause more harm because you are leave the underlying condition untreated. You need to get yourself checked what you may be having is intermittent tachycardia / arrhythmia which means that intermittently your heart rate increases or the heart Rhythm changes which can be dangerous if it does not get corrected on its own. Or it can be an early sign of impending heart disease. but to diagnose it you need to get an ECG done while you are having the rhythm problem or you can get holter monitoring for 24 hours during which if you have this episode it will get registered and documented. Also you need to get a complete lipid profile done as well as a echocardiogram and blood sugar and thyroid levels to look for risk factors. Once you have done that Get back to me with the reports for a detailed consultation.  Meanwhile Watch these simple explanatory videos for understanding  the problem. Copy the link address to  browser https://youtu.be/uyedrh9cqhk Do check out other videos on my channel and follow me on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/dr.education.youtube/ Subscribe My channel on YouTube for detailed explanation about you  health  concerns https://www.youtube.com/dreducation Regards Dr. Paramjeet Singh PHYSICIAN CARDIOLOGIST YASHODA SUPERSPECIALITY HOSPITAL
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Disclaimer : The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.
Disclaimer : The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.