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Unable to concentrate on anything
I trying really hard to get help for my anxieties. Lately, I am unable to concentrate on my work because of this. I react impulsively and this makes it hard for me to maintain relationships. Most of the time, I try to stay quite hoping that it will help and does help for a moment but then again I can't after sometime. I never wanted to talk about this but it is making my life harder.
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Hi. Many times people with long-term concentration issues get misdiagnosed as anxiety disorders. Difficulty maintaining relationships because of impulsive behaviour, severe anxiety and concentration issue, especially when there is restlessness that you feel from inside: there is a separate distinct diagnosis to be made here. Feel  You need diagnosis, treatment and counselling from a trained psychiatrist.
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free to contact/messege me. you can also look up my video on ADHD on YouTube at my channel 'mind life and beyond with Dr. Utkarsh Mankar.' for more understanding.
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1. Think right In the above description of anxiety several times the words “fear,” “fear of failure,” and “fear of not measuring up” were used. Freud said a century or so ago that depressed people rue the past and anxious individuals fear the future. These notions represent thoughts. Cognitive psychology purports that thoughts determine our feelings. If someone thinks something will hurt them or they anticipate failure or embarrassment, how would you expect that person to feel? Anxious, of course. Therefore, much of the anxiety plaguing millions of people daily is the result of negative thinking: “What if ____ happens? What if I fail? This could be bad!? What if he/she doesn’t like me or rejects me? This could be the worst possible thing!” etc. I refer to this kind of cognition as “stinkin thinkin.” While caution is appropriate in some situations (you won’t catch me skydiving, for example) over-cautious thinking creates feelings of anxiety and inhibits people. Daily life is a risk; we must come to accept it. If we can learn to “talk to ourselves” (think) in a supportive, modulated way, we can learn to manage our feelings, mood, and our anxiety. I regularly ask patients these questions to help them begin the process of dismantling their negative thinking: “Will I read about this in the newspaper? Will this be a big deal 24 hours from now? Who won the Super Bowl last year? (It was a huge deal then but now not so much.) Haven’t you already gone through something much worse—and survived?” 2. Exercise The research is clear. Exercise is an excellent, natural, healthy way to combat anxiety. Numerous studies have shown that a regular exercise program, high in aerobics, can be as effective a treatment for anxiety as is drug therapy. Twenty minutes of aerobics (in your “training zone”) three to four times a week will be productive. Brisk walking, jogging, biking, riding a stationary bike, or using any of the aerobic machines will work. 3. Relaxation Practice Relaxation methods can also be helpful in managing anxiety. Learning the techniques of proper breathing, progressive muscular tension and release, autogenics, and meditation, are excellent aids in coping with anxiety. 4. Baby steps Behavioral psychologists like to say, “The best way to deal with anxiety is to go through it.” Using a behavioral technique known as systematic desensitization, I help phobic and fearful individuals face their fear by having them take “baby steps” through their fear. For example, I will prescribe that an agoraphobic simply walk to the mailbox and back once each day for three to four days. When that is accomplished they next would walk to the corner and back for another three or four days, followed by walking around the block, etc. Practicing relaxation techniques before they take their baby steps will facilitate the process. By using these various approaches, medical and psychological—individually or in combination—anxiety can be successfully managed.
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Disclaimer : The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.
Disclaimer : The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.