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Tension headache and anxiety
I don't know if my anxiety is giving me tension headache or vice versa . What shall i do ? can it be treated ?
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Therapy, especially cognitive behavioral therapy, which focuses on behavior change, or exposure therapy, which can help people deal with irrational fears in a safe and controlled environment. These are considered highly effective for anxiety. You can find a therapist who practices these specific methods at the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Stress reduction methods, such as yoga, meditation, and mindfulness, have been shown to be effective in controlling symptoms of anxiety. Best of all, you can often practice these at home, at no cost. Exercise is another free way to manage anxiety symptoms. Even a brief walk can boost mood and reduce stress. Exercise is another free way to manage anxiety symptoms. Medications such as antidepressants for mood, mild tranquilizers to reduce panic, sleep aids, and beta-blockers to treat shaking and racing heart symptoms are all considered tools for managing symptoms, though they don’t treat the underlying causes. Learn more about the most common types of anxiety medications doctors prescribe. Herbal supplements and natural remedies such as omega 3 fatty acids can also be helpful. With your doctor’s permission, you might consider trying one of these home remedies for natural anxiety relief. CBD and other types of medical marijuana may take the edge off anxiety, though many doctors urge caution. Don’t turn to alcohol or recreational drugs, because they can lead to addiction and make your anxiety symptoms worse. Take a break. Anxiety makes you feel like you’re always running away from disaster. If you step back and take a breather, you’ll notice how smoothly the world spins without constant vigilance. Stay nourished. Feeling anxious can ruin your appetite or trigger junk food binges, which can make you feel jittery or worse. Try eating more whole-food, plant-based or protein-packed meals and snacks to boost your energy and keep your blood sugar even. Unplug. Social media is a proven source of anxiety for many people, but it can also help you stay connected. If you feel the need to go online, choose friendly, good-news sources and block those that make you feel more anxious. Limit caffeine and alcohol. Stimulants can aggravate anxiety and—in large doses—even trigger panic attacks. Go for seltzer, decaf coffee or hot or iced herbal tea instead. (Be sure to limit these other anxiety-inducing foods, too.) Get enough sleep. Anxiety can make it hard to sleep, and lack of sleep makes anxiety symptoms worse. Break that vicious cycle by avoiding caffeine and using these simple tricks to get to sleep. If these don’t work, talk to your doctor about trying sleep medication. Exercise. It’s worth repeating: Moving can help you burn energy and release soothing chemicals in your brain. Even a little bit helps. Take deep breaths. Deep, diaphragmatic breathing may give you a more positive outlook. Try to make your inhales and exhales the same duration. Daily mindful breathing exercises have been shown to measurably reduce anxiety and depression symptoms. Laugh! Ok, you’re not seeing much to chuckle about in life—or your anxiety. But try laughing at both and see how much better you feel. Avoid triggers. If certain people or situations make you feel especially fearful or panicked, avoid them until you’re more in control. Not sure what’s really bothering you? Write in a journal or track your symptoms in an app. Connect with others. Isolation is both a symptom of and a trigger for anxiety. Talk to your friends and family, even if you’re feeling overwhelmed, or consider joining a support group. Just being around people, even if you don’t feel like socializing, can defuse your symptoms. There’s an app for that. Anxiety is prevalent among young people, so it’s no wonder many free apps and trackers are available to help people manage their symptoms and get access to care.
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It will be there, consult Psychiatrist and get treated you will be better
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Yes.. You need to consult
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Disclaimer : The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.
Disclaimer : The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.