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Painful intercourse
Cant have intercourse the pain is unbearable, even inserting finger causes unbearable pain. I tried lidocaine after reading online for short relieve, but even tht doesnt work now.No signs of infction or abnormal behaviour. And sometimes i skip periods. Is it normal? What should i do?whom should i consult ?  from delhi.
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Dr. Jyotsna Gupta
Gynecologist 15 yrs exp Delhi

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It will be better to consult a gynaec . any anatomical cause or spasm can be ruled out by examination . if anatomical cause then surgery will help. if spasm then patience and training along with medicines will help.
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Dr. Radhakrishnan nair
Gynecologist 27 yrs exp Ernakulam
Dr Hithysh has given in detail about painful intercourse. First of all consult a gynaecologist as you are having irregular periods and after her examination of ruling out an anatomical reasons you can visit a sexologist with your husband. It looks like vaginismus from your history as you are finding difficult to insert a finger.
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Dr. Hithysh BM
General Physician 3 yrs exp Bangalore
hello painful sexual intercourse is termed as dyspareunia  causes of painful intercourse differ, depending on whether the pain occurs at entry or with deep thrusting. Emotional factors can be associated with many types of painful intercourse. exercises that can decrease pain. Your therapist may recommend pelvic floor exercises (Kegel exercises) or other techniques to decrease pain with intercourse. Counseling or sex therapy. If sex has been painful for a long time, you may experience a negative emotional response to sexual stimulation even after treatment. If you and your partner have avoided intimacy because of painful intercourse, you may also need help improving communication with your partner and restoring sexual intimacy. Talking to a counselor or sex therapist can help resolve these issues. Entry pain Pain during penetration may be associated with a range of factors, including: Insufficient lubrication. This is often the result of not enough foreplay. Insufficient lubrication is also commonly caused by a drop in estrogen levels after menopause, after childbirth or during breast-feeding. Certain medications are known to inhibit desire or arousal, which can decrease lubrication and make sex painful. These include antidepressants, high blood pressure medications, sedatives, antihistamines and certain birth control pills. Injury, trauma or irritation. This includes injury or irritation from an accident, pelvic surgery, female circumcision or a cut made during childbirth to enlarge the birth canal (episiotomy). Inflammation, infection or skin disorder. An infection in your genital area or urinary tract can cause painful intercourse. Eczema or other skin problems in your genital area also can be the problem. Vaginismus. Involuntary spasms of the muscles of the vaginal wall (vaginismus) can make attempts at penetration very painful. Congenital abnormality. A problem present at birth, such as the absence of a fully-formed vagina (vaginal agenesis) or development of a membrane that blocks the vaginal opening (imperforate hymen), could be the underlying cause of dyspareunia. Deep pain Deep pain usually occurs with deep penetration and may be more pronounced with certain positions. Causes include: Certain illnesses and conditions. The list includes endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, uterine prolapse, retroverted uterus, uterine fibroids, cystitis, irritable bowel syndrome, hemorrhoids and ovarian cysts. Surgeries or medical treatments. Scarring from pelvic surgery, including hysterectomy, can sometimes cause painful intercourse. Medical treatments for cancer, such as radiation and chemotherapy, can cause changes that make sex painful. Emotional factors Emotions are deeply intertwined with sexual activity and may play a role in any type of sexual pain. Emotional factors include: Psychological problems. Anxiety, depression, concerns about your physical appearance, fear of intimacy or relationship problems can contribute to a low level of arousal and a resulting discomfort or pain. Stress. Your pelvic floor muscles tend to tighten in response to stress in your life. This can contribute to pain during intercourse. kindly contact psychiatrist and gynaecologist.
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