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Left eye redness
The left eye is half red with blood type fluid. He was feeling a strain for 2-3 days in his left eye. Has high BP and is diabetic. What could the reason be and what is the diagnosis.
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According to your history, it seems to be subconjunctival hemorrhage. NOTE: As diagnosis is provisional, you should get it examined first by an ophthalmologist near you (to rule out other differentials and confirm the diagnosis) and then get treatment accordingly. A subconjunctival hemorrhage is blood that is located between the conjunctiva and the underlying sclera.  The most common causes are coughing, sneezing, straining, or any similar action that temporarily raises blood pressure in the veins, leading to a small rupture in a blood vessel or capillary. Subconjunctival hemorrhage can also occur because of trauma to the eye — even minor trauma such as rubbing the eye vigorously. Other common but less frequent causes of subconjunctival hemorrhage include diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure, and excessive amounts of certain medications such as aspirin or blood thinners like warfarin , which affect the body’s bleeding mechanisms. In your case, it seems to be High BP, which should be controlled and get better examined by physician for your High BP. Regarding Treatment, Usually, no treatment is needed. Some artificial tears drops can be applied to the eye if mild irritation is present. The eye does Not require a patch. The use of aspirin or other medication that inhibits clotting should be avoided for a period. .  This condition clears by itself within one to two weeks. Recovery is usually complete, without any long-term problems, similar to a mild bruise under the skin. 
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Your symptoms seems suggestive for subconjunctival hemorrhage. The conjunctiva is the clear tissue that covers the white of the eye (the sclera) and lines the inside of both eyelids. A subconjunctival hemorrhage is blood from a broken blood vessel that is one of the tiny blood vessels located between the conjunctiva and the underlying sclera. The following can occasionally result in a spontaneous subconjunctival hemorrhage: - Sneezing - Coughing - Straining/vomiting or a Valsalva maneuver, increasing the pressure in the veins of the head, as in weight lifting or lying on an inversion table upside-down - Eye rubbing or inserting contact lenses - Certain infections of the outside of the eye (conjunctivitis) where a virus or a bacteria weaken the walls of small blood vessels under the conjunctiva - Medical disorder causing bleeding or inhibiting normal clotting - The use of anticoagulant medication such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) or other blood thinners. This is usually self resolving, you can use artificial tears if there's any irritation. If problems such as subconjunctival hemorrhage is associated with pain, changes in vision (for example, blurry vision, double vision, difficulty seeing), a history of recent injury or trauma, and a history of bleeding disorder, you should visit the opthalmologist at the earliest
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If condition persists or worsens visit the opthalmologist at the earliest
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Disclaimer : The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.