Abrasion and contusion

I met with a bad accident 9 days ago and abrasion and contusion on right calf muscle happened. I was on medication for a week. But still, some part of wound is yet to heal and redness prevails. Still causing pain too. Is this Normal? Should I consult doc? I'm dressing it using Betadine everyday. What's healing period?
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Doctor Answers (1) on Abrasion and contusion

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Dr. Chethan R S Bangalore | General Physician
Hi, Wound healing is a complex and dynamic process of replacing devitalized and missing cellular structures and tissue layers. 
Primary healing, delayed primary healing, and healing by secondary intention are the 3 main categories of wound healing. 
Category 1

Primary wound healing or healing by first intention occurs within hours of repairing a full-thickness surgical incision. This surgical insult results in the mortality of a minimal number of cellular constituents.

Category 2

If the wound edges are not reapproximated immediately, delayed primary wound healing transpires. This type of healing may be desired in the case of contaminated wounds. By the fourth day, phagocytosis of contaminated tissues is well underway, and the processes of epithelization, collagen deposition, and maturation are occurring. Foreign materials are walled off by macrophages that may metamorphose into epithelioid cells, which are encircled by mononuclear leukocytes, forming granulomas. Usually the wound is closed surgically at this juncture, and if the "cleansing" of the wound is incomplete, chronic inflammation can ensue, resulting in prominent scarring.

Category 3

A third type of healing is known as secondary healing or healing by secondary intention. In this type of healing, a full-thickness wound is allowed to close and heal. Secondary healing results in an inflammatory response that is more intense than with primary wound healing. In addition, a larger quantity of granulomatous tissue is fabricated because of the need for wound closure. Secondary healing results in pronounced contraction of wounds. Fibroblastic differentiation into myofibroblasts, which resemble contractile smooth muscle, is believed to contribute to wound contraction. These myofibroblasts are maximally present in the wound from the 10th-21st days.

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