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Colloid cyst

My father (72 yrs) recently diagnosed with colloid cyst in third ventricle. He has all the symptoms like memory loss, drowsiness, vomiting.. Recently he is not even to walk as his legs and hands are shaking ( leg getting stiff) while standing. He is also a kidney patient with little high creatinine. He is under treatment under a nefrologist from last 10 yrs. But recently his condition has become worse as he is always in drowsiness, does not have the wish to speak or listen anything. If we treat colloid cyst, his problem will be resolved? (CT scan found cyst size is less) do you treat colloid cyst. Please tell me in details, expected cost of surgery, success chance of surgery, method of surgery (micro or open skull), chance of repeating cyst, and how many days to be admitted in hospital .
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Dr. Deepak A N
Neurosurgeon 8 yrs exp Ernakulam

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for any surgical conditions we look for this factors 1. is patient overall health suitable for surgery 2. is condition requires surgery 3. by surgery is symptoms are relieved or not. 1.ur father is in old age , diabetic with cardiac history not suitable for surgery 2. lesion is very small can be managed conservatively. get an mri 3. offcourse symptoms which u have mentioned is because of other neurological problem will not get improved by surgery alone. hope u can understand. u are welcome to contact me any time.
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Dr. Nitin Jagdhane
Neurosurgeon 6 yrs exp Mumbai
The lesion looks very small as per CT scan but the MRI would be definitely helpful to further delineate the lesion a better way. Colloid cyst of small size can always be managed conservatively but the symptoms which you have mentioned need to be considered. These lesions know to cause intermittent blockage of CSF leading to intermittent attack. Other health issues will certainly decide whether he'll benefit from any intervention.
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See a neurosurgeon for clinical evaluation before you investigate further.
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